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File types for copying to dvd, which are which.

Discussion in 'FOXSAT-HDR Freesat Recorder' started by charentejohn, Nov 3, 2012.

  1. charentejohn

    charentejohn New Member

    Hello, new to this forum so hope I don't ask too many dumb questions.
    I have had a Humax box for about 3 years now and really like it, best purchase for a long time.

    My problem is that I can't record to DVD because my old Panasonic freesat DVD recorder writer finally died after many years of service. I used to burn DVDs using this by playing them on the Humax in real time into the Panasonic, then editing using the Panasonic before using it to burn the DVD.
    A bit clunky but worked well.

    Since it died I thought I would try just copying the files from the Humax and editing in windows media player then burn using the PC. I am sure you can see where this is going.....

    I finally managed this with a BBC series but still not movies. All of these are recorded in SD so I hoped they would copy properly. Copied to an external hard drive.

    When copied, for the series I ended up with file types .hmt (about 7k) .nts (about 5mb) and .ts (says mpeg-2ts.ts about 70mb). These work fine as the mpeg-2ts plays 'as is' so my question is are the .nts and .hmt files needed if I copy to DVD ?

    For the films I only have .hmt and .nts files copied, no hidden files on disc. These files don't do anything.

    Reading around this and other forums and web sites I see that recording HD can be a problem, ok for me as I am happy with SD recordings.
    I believe that most if not all TV series should copy ok and end up as mpeg2 so I can edit / burn them to DVD using the PC ?
    For movies, they should copy but not at the moment, so what am I doing wrong ?

    I was impatient when copying some movies as they seemed to take forever, the 30 min series I copied took a few minutes to do so. Is it just that I should allow more time or are some SD movies also encrypted some way ?
    I have no problem waiting for them to copy as long as they do it ok.

    An idiots guide type explanation would be appreciated as all this is new to me, I will figure it out but could use some help as I currently don't unsderstand what is doing what to what and why.....
     
  2. grahamlthompson

    grahamlthompson Well-Known Member

    You only need the .ts file (transport stream). The other 2 are purely support files that the foxsat needs. You need DVD authoring software to create the correct file and folder structure for a DVD. Try DVDflick, it's not very fast but it is free.

    http://www.dvdflick.net/
     
  3. charentejohn

    charentejohn New Member

    Thanks, I am slowly getting there, even managed to copy a film today so the copy does work just takes a while.
    Good to know all I need are the .ts files.

    You are right about DVD format though. I used Windows photo gallery / movie maker to edit the files to remove ads. etc and it saved them as .wav.
    This is apparently windows standard, but I think I would prefer mpeg format of some type as .wav won't play on the Humax.
    I am still experimenting and so saved copies as SD and HS (ish) in .wav format. These play on the PC but not on the Humax so I assume the 2 missing files are the problem, it shows the video but won't play it.

    Will copying the changed format from the external hard drive back to the Humax reinstate the files and allow them to play ?
    I am using the USB port on the front ot the player, is the rear one different ? would this allow them to play ?

    I will keep investigating, next step to burn a DVD with original Mpeg-2 .wav and HD ish .wav files and see how / if they play in my old DVD player.
    If anyone knows of a list of file types and conversion programs it would help.
    I don't mind buying proper software, like Nero ?, if they will do the job.
     
  4. grahamlthompson

    grahamlthompson Well-Known Member

    wav files are uncompressed audio files, not video files ( the format you get if you rip a CD in full quality) If you want a the easiest and fastest mpeg editor try VideoRedo TVsuite, this will edit out ads and create your DVD's. Windows uses WMV files for video (Windows Media Video)

    DVD requires mpeg2 programme stream files (.mpg). Converting mpeg2 transport stream (,ts) to programme stream (.mpg) is lossless, it's just a different container.

    http://www.videoredo.com/en/ProductTVS.htm

    There's no difference between the front and rear usb ports.
     
  5. charentejohn

    charentejohn New Member

    I see, I had heard of videoredo, the Redo plus should do me as I only want to edit movies windows media player is good at music.
    As wmv stands for windows media video that explains why windows can play the edited files but the Humax can't.
    If I use videoredo I should be able to just edit and save in the same format, just like editing a word document. Makes a lot more sense.
    Shame windows won't allow me to save in the original format, it will only save as a windows file type.

    I don't want an all singing and dancing editing suite, just enough to remove ads etc and save to a DVD to play in my normal player.
    I see videoredo does a trial version so I will play about downloading more files from the Humax then see what I can do with them after that.
     
  6. grahamlthompson

    grahamlthompson Well-Known Member

    You are a bit confused about the process.

    Firstly you need to create a edited file in a format that DVD understands. Videoredo plus will do this very quickly and produce a file that is DVD compliant, because it only recodes video at edit points it's lightning fast.

    This is just the first process in creating a DVD that any DVD player will play back. DVD's have capabilities far beyond just playing back a file, like Menus, Chapter Selections etc. A DVD needs a specific file and folder structure, it's not as simple as just copying a file to a DVD blank.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DVD-Video

    The TVsuite version of Videoredo includes this capability built in, if you have just videoredo plus you need a seperate programme like DVDflick to create the actual DVD.

    Neither version is a full featured video editor, they only allow you to cut out portions of video and/or join multiple clips seamlessly and very very quickly. Video editing software like Adobe Premier/Sony Vegas have a vast range of additional capability beyond just cut editing.
     
  7. charentejohn

    charentejohn New Member

    I hadn't realised videoredo coudn't create actual discs. Luckily these come as 15 day trial versions as I also tried Nero, spent a rainy afternoon playing with both.
    Neither are as easy to edit with as windows movie maker but I have to say Nero seems better value for money, slightly more than videoredo but does much more.
    I struggled with Nero as I couldn't figure out how to save in other than nero format. all to do with being 'exported video' rather than a saved file. I will figure it out in time. Nero is a lot slower to save files compared to videoredo but I could live with that, offers more options once I can figure out the differences.

    Seems that Mpeg-2 is what to go for but aspect ratio, audio etc are still a mystery. I am leaning towards Nero now but will need to experiment further.
    I wrote test pieces of the same bit of video from the Humax reformatted different ways via Nero and Videoredo and no difference, I guess Mpeg 2 is Mpeg 2. At least Nero will write a DVD ok.

    The Sony option seemed good, especially the tutorials, but seemed to only be offred as a montly subscription, more for serious DVD makers rather than me saving a few episodes of Fawlty tuwers :)
     
  8. charentejohn

    charentejohn New Member

    Just found the Sony version for the same priceas the others.
    Still tricky in actually saving the file, yu don't save it you render it if you want a choice of file types. I would get used to it in the end I guess.
    All in all the most straightforward seems to be the Videoredo as it saves changes instantly, the others take ages as they (I think) are saving in real time so 10 min video takes 10 mins. That said they do a lot more Sony is easier to use but also only does video, but their 'show me' help system is brilliant. Nero is not as well laid out but does do audio files, backups etc so more for your money.

    Still undecided on which one to go for so will play around with them all for the 15 day trial period, but at least I know I can save video from the Humax to disc and then edit and burn it to DVD in a generally usable format. Just a matter of deciding which system to use to do that.