LAN speed ?

makem

Member
Any idea what the maximum wired LAN speed is?

My router has gigabit speed as does my laptop (well it will when the Express Card adapter arrives) and I wondered if the speed of uploading files to the Humax will improve.
 

Trev

The Dumb One
If you try to convince yourself long enough that it will, then it will. (But it won't:)) Your Hummy is now the slowest bit on your network
 

dragon-it

Member
Unlikely, each packet ends up at your gigabit switch and then gets sent back out at 100Mbit speed on the Humax port.
 

Black Hole

May contain traces of nut
I don't see how you expect the Humax network interface to speed up just because you now have a Gigabit switch (which uses eight wires in the Cat5 instead of four) connected to it.

To ensure the Gigabit-capable parts of your network operate at Gigabit, configure them manually rather than relying on auto-negotiation (which may well decide to work at the highest common denominator).
 
OP
makem

makem

Member
I currently have 10/100 laptop > 1.0 Gbps router > 10/100 humax

I thought maybe, just maybe 1.0 Gbps laptop > 1.0 Gbps router > 10/100 humax might, just might give a little more speed than I currently get.

I didn't buy the Express Card just for that. It was an ex-display unit going very very cheap so I had it. I thought that for a couple of £'s it would keep this laptop going if/when I buy another laptop. (Xmas gift :) )
 

Black Hole

May contain traces of nut
The latency might improve, but not the average data rate (or if it does it will be too little to notice).
 

dragon-it

Member
Only any different between the PC and another gigabit device such as NAS or another PC. If your router can share a USB device you could put a drive on that and access it from the Humax and the PC...
 
OP
makem

makem

Member
Only any different between the PC and another gigabit device such as NAS or another PC. If your router can share a USB device you could put a drive on that and access it from the Humax and the PC...

I have USB drive shared on the router but sending a file there, although quick would still be slow sending to the Humax and two stage as I want the files to end be on the Humax.

A similar circumstance in the sending of files to the USB drives on the pi to play from there. I though/hoped speeds may improve there also.
 

Ezra Pound

Well-Known Member
That is contrary to what I have read. Cat5 is ok but if you don't have one then buy Cat6 to be future proof was the advice.
It wouldn't be a problem for short patch leads, but if you are cabling your house for gigabit ethernet you need Cat6
 

Brian

Administrator
Staff member
I have Cat6 cables for all of my devices, although I understand that Cat5E would also be OK. My router, HomePlugs, ethernet switches, laptop, and PS3 are all Gigabit rated, but my HD/HDR-FOX T2's, TV, and Blu-ray player are 10/100 rated.
 

af123

Administrator
Staff member
It wouldn't be a problem for short patch leads, but if you are cabling your house for gigabit ethernet you need CAT6
No, Cat5e is fine for Gigabit 1000BASE-T up to 100 yards. 1000BASE-TX requires Cat6 but that never took off.


Posted on the move; please excuse any brevity.
 

Ezra Pound

Well-Known Member
Cat5 and Cat5e are two different animals. I would say that although there would be a measurable difference transmitting gigabit over Cat5e and Cat6, to the general user the difference probably wouldn't be noticeable
 

af123

Administrator
Staff member
Gigabit's fine over Cat5 too - IEEE 802.3ab only states Cat5 or better. 1000BASE-TX was going to be cheaper for manufacturers to implement but its Cat6 requirement stopped adoption.

Most of my work these days involves 10GbE and for that you do need Cat6a or better if you're going to use copper.

Posted on the move; please excuse any brevity.
 

Ezra Pound

Well-Known Member
If Cat6 had no advantages over Cat5e, it wouldn't exist. If the comment in post #7 had said Cat5e rather than Cat5 I probably wouldn't have mentioned it
 
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