Streaming to Android device?

ian_j

Member
Has anyone used their android device for streaming from the HDR-Fox T2 ?

If so can the recommend which software/settings to use.
 
OP
I

ian_j

Member
Ok so I installed Mediahouse & MX Player

MX Player wouldn't work but BS Player does.

The video is good quality but looks like it has scan lines, is that normal?
 
OP
I

ian_j

Member
HD works fine so I'm assuming it is because the program was broadcast in 576i

It's not too noticeable, but it is there.
 

Black Hole

May contain traces of nut
I think that's going to be something to do with the way your device is interpolating the 576 lines of source material onto however many lines your display has.
 

Andy Hurley

Member
I think that's going to be something to do with the way your device is interpolating the 576 lines of source material onto however many lines your display has.


It will be an interlace problem, the SD picture is sent as two fields which need to be combined into a single frame, if you display them in the order they are sent as 50 fields per second you will be able to see horizontal distortion on anything which is moving. I get the same when using VLC to play back on my laptop. There is a setting in VLC that turns on interlace which fixes it by combining the two fields into a single frame, there are many options for dealing with interlace but any of them should help, I use 'blend'. I would expect there to be something similar in your android app.
 

BucksLad

New Member
I'm trying to do the same as the OP - with limited success. I can view SD files without problems on the Android device but HD files remain stubbornly invisible in their library folders. One thing I'm not clear about is whether I need to decrypt the HD files (e.g. using auto-decrypt) in order to make it possible to stream them over the network. Can anyone offer any advice?
 

Black Hole

May contain traces of nut
If you are referring to DLNA streaming, files the display device is incompatible with are not listed. HiDef recordings cannot be streamed to any device unless it supports DTCP (see entry in the Glossary - click), unless you run the custom firmware auto-unprotect package (which is not the same as decryption). See also Things Every... (click) section 5.

Other means to get access to recordings from remote devices via a network connection require either decryption and download by FTP (to play locally), or decryption and access by network share (to play as if locally, but by NAS access). These mechanisms allow playback by a larger range of media players than just those which support DLNA.
 

grahamlthompson

Well-Known Member
If you are referring to DLNA streaming, files the display device is incompatible with are not listed. HiDef recordings cannot be streamed to any device unless it supports HDCP (see entry in the Glossary - click), unless you run the custom firmware auto-unprotect package (which is not the same as decryption). See also Things Every... (click) section 5.
.

HDCP is a hdmi copy protection system, it's nothing to do with DLNA. DTCP-IP DLNA certified devices are required for the client and server boxes. The latest Humax pvrs are such devices which is why they can share encrypted content.

See Protected Streaming/Link protection

http://www.dlna.org/dlna-for-industry/digital-living/how-it-works/technical-overview
 

BucksLad

New Member
If you are referring to DLNA streaming, files the display device is incompatible with are not listed. HiDef recordings cannot be streamed to any device unless it supports HDCP (see entry in the Glossary - click), unless you run the custom firmware auto-unprotect package (which is not the same as decryption). See also Things Every... (click) section 5.

Other means to get access to recordings from remote devices via a network connection require either decryption and download by FTP (to play locally), or decryption and access by network share (to play as if locally, but by NAS access). These mechanisms allow playback by a larger range of media players than just those which support DLNA.

Thanks for the quick reply.
Just to make sure I have understood you correctly, I believe therefore that all I should need to do is to run the custom firmware auto-unprotect package (which I am doing, in any case).
However, reading the encryption info in your link, the second bullet point seems to imply that I may be wasting my time anyway trying to stream HiDef recordings - or am I missing something?
 

grahamlthompson

Well-Known Member
Thanks for the quick reply.
Just to make sure I have understood you correctly, I believe therefore that all I should need to do is to run the custom firmware auto-unprotect package (which I am doing, in any case).
However, reading the encryption info in your link, the second bullet point seems to imply that I may be wasting my time anyway trying to stream HiDef recordings - or am I missing something?

Assuming auto-decrypt is working properly, then your recordings after processing will be unencrypted AVC/H264 transport stream files with a aac audio track. As already posted my Nexus7 plays them no problem. Without the autodecrypt another HDR FOX T2 (or HD FOX T2) will play back recorded encrypted HD content from a HDR FOX T2 thanks to DTCP-IP compliance (no CF required). It's similar to HDCP in that the two talk to each other to allow playback of protected content.
 

Black Hole

May contain traces of nut
HDCP is a hdmi copy protection system, it's nothing to do with DLNA. DTCP-IP DLNA certified devices are required for the client and server boxes. The latest Humax pvrs are such devices which is why they can share encrypted content.
A simple error of memory, I knew what I meant - corrected (for "HDCP" read "DTCP"). Both terms are in the Glossary (and have been for a very long time).
 
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