What is using the space?

danco

Member
The [cut] folder i my [edit] folder is showing 9 GiB used. But when I open the folder, there are just the three basic directories with size a few kilobytes, and no indicidual files. What reason can there be for this?

If the space is taken up by invisible files, can they be made visible?Or is there some other way of finding out what is taking up the space?
 

Ezra Pound

Well-Known Member
I am not sure where the [cut] and [edit] folders reside, are these folder you have created?. All files can be viewed with Web-If >> Diagnostics >> File Editor >> Open
 

nvingo

Member
The My Video/[edit] folder exists to contain files being copied/edited by the nicesplice package. Files moved there via the Humax OSD can be processed without control from the webif.
The folder contains the subfolders [cut], [join], [make copy] and [tsr]
 
OP
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danco

Member
I'm not sure myself exactly where those folders live. They are set up when one installs nicesplice and nicesplice magic folders, and are visible on the Humax itself or in the web interface.

Following your suggestion, I do see a lot of files in [cut] that are not directly visible in the web interface or on the box, and I don't know why they are present. They must have been left over from something

When I try to open such a file using File Editor I get a message such as

The Flying Archaeologist_20130506_2028-cut270513093927 is not a plain file (application/octet-stream)

I expect the files could just be deleted, but I have no idea how to delete such items.
 
OP
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danco

Member
Thanks. As I mentioned, the files weren't visible in the web interface or on the box. And I would still like to know why they even existed.

But they did appear with an FTP connection, and were then easy to delete.
 

Ezra Pound

Well-Known Member
I'm not sure myself exactly where those folders live.
Yes, As stated by nvingo the folders are generated by nicesplice magic folders and can be found under /media/My Video/[edit]/[cut] etc., File editor will only open text (readable) files, so it won't open your Flying Archeaologist ts file and it won't let you delete files either. You would have to Telnet in and delete the files from there, af123 ma be able to generate a diagnostic 'clear-edit' script to do this for you
 

Black Hole

May contain traces of nut
Thanks. As I mentioned, the files weren't visible in the web interface or on the box. And I would still like to know why they even existed.
The SUI or WebIF media browsers only show up files with dot extensions that are identified with playable media (.ts, .mp4 etc). In the case of .ts, the displayed name represents a group of files (.ts, .hmt, .thm, .nts). Files not conforming to this do not show up on the SUI or WebIF, but of course will be found using the unfiltered view available by FTP or direct operating system commands such as ls (list) on a Telnet command line.

Non-conforming files could be intermediate results from a process which should have been deleted afterwards (if the machine got turned off before the deletion took place for example), or the result of a bug causing them to not be deleted or misnamed. We did have a bug a while ago which caused moved files to lose the dot!
 

Ezra Pound

Well-Known Member
The argument has always been around, does the KIM-1 have 1000 bytes of static ram or 1024 bytes? In base 10 1K = 1000 in base 2 it's 1024. At less than 2.5% difference I'm not sure its worth arguing about
 

kevindickinson

Active Member
By jove your right - from wiki: "The KIM-1 brochure said "1 K BYTE RAM" but it actually had 1152 bytes"

May be going a bit off topic!

The KIM-1 consisted of a single printed circuit board with all the components on one side. It included three main ICs; the MCS6502 CPU, and two MCS6530 Peripheral Interface/Memory Devices. The MCS6530 "is comprised of a mask programmable 1024 x 8 ROM, a 64 x 8 RAM, two 8 bit bi-directional ports …and a programmable interval timer…".[3] The KIM-1 brochure said "1 K BYTE RAM" but it actually had 1152 bytes. The memory was composed of eight 6102 static RAMs(1024 x 1 bits) and the two 64 byte RAMs of the MCS6530s. In the 1970s memory sizes were expressed in several ways. Semiconductor manufacturers would use a precise memory size such as 2048 by 8 and sometimes state the number of bits (16384). Mini and mainframe computers had various memory widths (8 bits to over 36 bits) so manufacturers would use the term "words", such as 4K words. The early hobbyist computer advertisements would use both "words" and "bytes". It was common to see "4096 words", "4K (4096) words" and "4 K bytes". The term KB was unused or very uncommon. The KIM-1 was introduced in the April 1976 issue of Byte magazine and the advertisement stated "1 K BYTE RAM" and "2048 ROM BYTES".[4]
 
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