1010S Wireless Not Connecting?

Stephen Hilton

New Member
Hi all,

Just purchased a 1010S and am having issues getting it to connect to my network. It detects the network fine, but then on entering the password it fails to connect. Connecting the system via Ethernet works with no issues, but is not sustainable long term due to not wanting the cable.

Are there any known issues with security types allowed? Mine is set-up as WEP with a pretty normal password. I very recently set-up a Kindle onto the network so I know it should be ok.

Thanks in advance for any pointers,
Stephen
 

prpr

Well-Known Member
Using WEP is like having a lock on the door on your house built with paper walls.
 
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Stephen Hilton

New Member
Thanks for your concern :) My lack of network skillz is only matched by my level of concern regarding this.

Your response doesn't exactly answer my question though.

I am getting a new router soon so will see what happens when that appears.

Cheers
 

grahamlthompson

Well-Known Member
Thanks for your concern :) My lack of network skillz is only matched by my level of concern regarding this.

Your response doesn't exactly answer my question though.

I am getting a new router soon so will see what happens when that appears.

Cheers

If your password includes spaces and non standard characters the 1010s is known to have problems. If it does try removing these.
 
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Stephen Hilton

New Member
Thanks, my password is 5 letters followed by 8 numbers, so nothing untoward there. There isn't a length restriction is there?
 

grahamlthompson

Well-Known Member
What idiotic bunch of moronic cretins would sell a device with those restrictions???:rolling:

Typical remark. To make these sort of devices affordable, commercial large scale integrated devices are used to provide the basic services. I imagine the restrictions are built in to the hardware. Common sense dictates you should create filenames and passwords that should be usable on any device you may have to use.

http://www.mtu.edu/umc/services/web/cms/characters-avoid/

If you want this sort of flexibility I suggest you need to buy a device with a fully programmeable cpu like a PC. Mind you don't expect it to be anywhere near as useable as a dedicated pvr, nor be available at a similar price. What sort of moronic cretin would make such observations based on ignorance of how this sort of processing power is produced at a cost most of us can afford ?

Interested to know what device other than a PC you have that has unlimited access to the whole ANSI character set for WiFi passwords.
 

Trev

The Dumb One
As most of the 'special characters' have standard ASCII values,, why exclude them?
 

prpr

Well-Known Member
To make these sort of devices affordable, commercial large scale integrated devices are used to provide the basic services. I imagine the restrictions are built in to the hardware.
Crap. Do you really believe this or did you just pluck it out of thin air? It's all just numbers between 00 and FF to the hardware. Why would anyone design hardware that only accepted alphanumeric codes? It is non-sensical.
If you want this sort of flexibility I suggest you need to buy a device with a fully programmeable cpu like a PC.
Oh, FFS. You really think the processors in these Humax boxes are somehow incapable of certain numeric operations?
If so, you really are very stupid.
What does "fully programmable" mean?
What sort of moronic cretin would make such observations based on ignorance of how this sort of processing power is produced at a cost most of us can afford ?
Looked in the mirror recently?

I can't bear bloody rubbish like this.
 

Black Hole

May contain traces of nut
I'm inclined to agree. More likely it was a decision the marketing department made with insufficient understanding of the market, or it was not specified at all and left up to a programmer somewhere to pluck out of the air (by choosing the wrong C string processing function). I find it very hard to accept it is a hardware limitation.

Functions such as these are not hardware - these system-on-chip systems integrate ARM or MIPS cores etc and are just as programmable as a PC. High throughput activities (eg video decoding, encryption) get some specialised hardware accelerators, that's all.
 
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MartinLiddle

Super Moderator
Staff member
I would have thought the issue was much more likely to be to do with providing a simple to use user interface to input the characters. The earlier 9200 (which didn't have any WiFi) had (I think) 4 screens of characters to cover all the likely characters but it was awkward to use. I guess Humax dumbed it down to make it simpler for the user.
 

Trev

The Dumb One
I guess Humax dumbed it down to make it simpler for the user.
That's despite the fact that the consensus it to use 'special characters' in passwords to make them more secure:frantic: It's only 'simpler for the user' if they use an 'easy' password and why would anyone do that? As for 'WEP 'security:disagree:
I'm still with Mike0001, forcing users to use simple passwords is 'Madness'. If people (rightly) use complex passwords, they probably expect to have a little bit of a problem or inconvenience using them when compared with 'non-special' characters, but not to be prevented from using them altogether anywhere in their network because some stupid manufacturer decides it's too difficult with their cumbersome password input method.
 

Black Hole

May contain traces of nut
It's a major reason I have never experimented with a WiFi connection to my HDRs - my WiFi network WPA pass code is a maximum length random string, and I can't even type it successfully on a device with a proper keyboard (I have to copy and paste it)! No chance on a HDR-FOX (which, even disregarding the limited character set, times out the input dialogue around the 16 character mark). I could play with a temporary guest network if I really wanted to...
 

Trev

The Dumb One
My WiFi network WPA pass code is a maximum length random string, and I can't even type it successfully on a device with a proper keyboard (I have to copy and paste it)!
That's the angle that I was coming from. But the really long really complex pass code is your choice. But even a modest length random passcode such as the one that I use can be a pain. I do however have a 'Guest' WiFi network on my router which has no access to the rest of the stuff on my network on which I use a simpler passcode (but not WEP).
 

grahamlthompson

Well-Known Member
That's despite the fact that the consensus it to use 'special characters' in passwords to make them more secure:frantic: It's only 'simpler for the user' if they use an 'easy' password and why would anyone do that? As for 'WEP 'security:disagree:
I'm still with Mike0001, forcing users to use simple passwords is 'Madness'. If people (rightly) use complex passwords, they probably expect to have a little bit of a problem or inconvenience using them when compared with 'non-special' characters, but not to be prevented from using them altogether anywhere in their network because some stupid manufacturer decides it's too difficult with their cumbersome password input method.

A random choice of 126 characters is hardly insecure.
 

Trev

The Dumb One
Please point out where I implied that 126 random chars is insecure.:eek: That certainly was not my intention.
 

Mike2

Forum Supporter
I have no objection to excluding special characters, even though their use is highly recommended these days, when hackers can take down just about any large corporation or government agency.

My major objection is to the exclusion of the humble space, a character that is on any on-screen representation of a keyboard. My router password has four of them and is otherwise alphanumeric. I don't see why it should be necessary to change that just because my Humax boxes are lacking.

Plus, on a grammatical note, it is called a pass phrase after all.

Also, the Humλx WiFi dongle fails to accept my pass phrase when plugged into a Humλx box, yet happily accepts it when plugged into my laptop.

What other devices fail to recognise a space in a pass phrase for WiFi? I can't think of any.

Finally, why stick a lambda in ΗUΜΛX if you hate special characters so much?
 
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Trev

The Dumb One
How on earth can you call a string of random characters a phrase. In linguistic analysis, a phrase is a group of words (or possibly a single word) that functions as a constituent in the syntax of a sentence- Here Surely it's a code.
 
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