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Archive SD recording to DVD via MPEG, step by step

Discussion in 'HD/HDR-FOX T2 Customised Firmware' started by LDW, Aug 1, 2012.

  1. LDW

    LDW Member

    Thanks to all for help so far in this process. I am downloading an MPEG file, as TS files are less acceptable to DVD burning software.

    Here is what I think the process requires. Please let me know if I've missed anything, or am doing anything unnecessary.


    i) Install WebIf

    ii) Install ffmpeg

    iii) From the WebIf on the PC (or other), select 'BROWSE'

    iv) Next to the recorded programme to be archived, click on OPT+

    v) Click on DECRYPT. Wait for decryption to take place

    vi) DEC appears next to the progamme in black type on a green ground

    vii) Click again on and select extract to MPG

    viii) Click on PERFORM MPG EXTRACTION. Wait for extraction to complete

    ix) Click BROWSE. You now have two files - the original and a copy with .mpg suffix

    x) Click on OPT+ next to the .mpg one and select download

    xi) Select SAVE FILE. Wait for download to complete

    x) Find the file you have saved, and play the video briefly to check all is well
    [VLC Media Player will do the job, and is a free download from videolan.org]

    xi) Load it into DVD burning software of your choice

    xii) Burn DVD
     
  2. grahamlthompson

    grahamlthompson Well-Known Member

    SD .ts files are mpeg2. Conversion to programme stream format (.mpg) should be lossless however you convert from one container to the other.
     
  3. LDW

    LDW Member


    I find the fugglewumps too diderous when I confold my semperity. :)

    Or...

    I say, Graham! Could I please have that again in English?

    Thanks!
     
  4. grahamlthompson

    grahamlthompson Well-Known Member

    DVD requires 720 x 576 25fps content compressed using mpeg2, that's the same content that get's recorded on your hard disc from a SD digital channel. It's wrapped up with other information in a format called transport stream (essentially designed for broadcast use). The basic file format for DVD is known as programme stream (.mpg), when on DVD it gets wrapped up with other data in files with a .vob format. Converting .ts to .mpg basically just means ignoring the other data in the .ts container. In fact many programmes just work if you change the file extention from .ts to .mpg as they can find the video data they need.

    The best all in one basic editing and conversion software isn't free but is super fast as it doesn't recode anything it doesnt have to.

    http://www.videoredo.com/en/ProductTVS.htm

    You can try it for free.
     
  5. LDW

    LDW Member

    Brilliant - thank you. Even I understand now!
     
  6. Black Hole

    Black Hole Felonius Gru

    The package I use, Serif MoviePlus, won't import a straight .ts even if it is renamed .mpg. Been there, done that. That's why I (personally) start with StDef decrypted, and convert to mpg before downloading.
     
  7. grahamlthompson

    grahamlthompson Well-Known Member

    The following which I use will

    Adobe Premiere Pro, Sony Vegas Movie Studio, Magix Edit pro, Videoredo TV suite, Video Redo plus, Nero Vision, Even Free Windows Live Movie Maker. In addition the free DVDflick does as well (horrendously slow). Apart from the very old Premiere Pro I have and Video Redo plus, they all also open AVCHD 1080i transport stream files as well. Time for a new editor :)
     
  8. Black Hole

    Black Hole Felonius Gru

    For the little I do? It works, it's good enough at the moment.
     
  9. af123

    af123 Administrator Staff Member

    Excellent timing - I have a film I need to archive to DVD!
     
  10. Ezra Pound

    Ezra Pound Well-Known Member

    I think Videoredo TV suite is hard to beat for TS to DVD with editing
     
  11. LDW

    LDW Member

    Just discovered Sothink Movie DVD Maker which burns .ts files to DVD very competently.

    Free if you can put up with a fairly inoffensive ad screen on the DVD - or 25 quid if you can't.