Booting stuck on "Nearly There" after software update

vadalus

New Member
Hi,
I have a DTR-T1000 which keeps on getting stuck on "Nearly There" when booting. If I reset / recover using the maintenance mode it all comes back fine and i can go through the first time install mode. If i cancel the "software update" step the box is perfectly useable again, but as soon as the automatic software update kicks in, the rebooted box never comes back.
I have done this numerous times with the same outcome each time. Does anyone know whether there are some known issues with the current latest software update? Failing that is there a way of stopping it auto installing the latest updates?
My box is less than a year old but i've lost the receipt of purchase else would have sent it back already
Many Thanks
Liam
 

Black Hole

May contain traces of nut
Your rights under the Sale of Goods Act do not require a receipt as proof of purchase - you can verify legitimate purchase and who from by any means (eg credit card statement). Further, for purchases over £200, your credit card company is jointly and severally liable with the supplier (a good reason never to use debit cards).
 

Black Hole

May contain traces of nut
Does it? That's news to me. My understanding was that the time was based on what would be considered reasonable for the type of product in question and the purchase cost - ie open to interpretation.
 

Mike2

Forum Supporter
Does it? That's news to me. My understanding was that the time was based on what would be considered reasonable for the type of product in question and the purchase cost - ie open to interpretation.


Which, in this case, would be at least two years anyway, but are you thinking of UK law? I thought this was what the EU law said:

'A two-year guarantee applies for the sale of all consumer goods everywhere in the EU. In some countries, this may be more, and some manufacturers also choose to offer a longer warranty period.'

http://ec.europa.eu/archives/publications/booklets/move/64/en.pdf
 

Black Hole

May contain traces of nut
This appears odd to me. UK law should not be different from EU law in this respect, and if it is different then the EU law is irrelevant. If this two year period does apply, then the large corporates (Tesco, Asda...) would be in line with it (their legal compliance departments would make sure of that).
 

Trev

The Dumb One
The length of the 'legal' guarantee is irrelevant to the OP's case as he says that his box is LESS than one year old but he has lost the receipt to which BH gives the answer in post two. You don't need the receipt, so long as you have an alternative proof of purchase to smooth the process.
The lesson here is to keep all receipts of stuff that you (even remotely) might have to return under guarantee. This will make the return/repair routine much smoother.
 

Black Hole

May contain traces of nut
Which, in this case, would be at least two years anyway, but are you thinking of UK law? I thought this was what the EU law said:

'A two-year guarantee applies for the sale of all consumer goods everywhere in the EU. In some countries, this may be more, and some manufacturers also choose to offer a longer warranty period.'

http://ec.europa.eu/archives/publications/booklets/move/64/en.pdf

I'm not sure how relevant these EU leaflets are. From http://ec.europa.eu/consumers/cons_int/safe_shop/guarantees/CSD_2007_EN_final.pdf (which is a report on how the specific EU countries have incorporated the EU directive - note directive not law - into their legislation):
The seller is liable under Article 3 where the lack of conformity becomes apparent within two years as from the moment of delivery (Article 5(1)). A majority of Member States have transposed this provision literally. Others have chosen to rely on the time limitation that is generally applicable in their contract law: Finland (3 years from delivery), Ireland and the UK (six years for both countries). The Netherlands has transposed a two years limitation period starting from the notification of the defect. In the Czech Republic there is a variation depending on the type of goods being sold (consumer goods – 2 years, foodstuff – 3 weeks, groceries– 8 days), which needs to be clarified. Portuguese law seems to go below the level of protection envisaged by the Directive by providing that an action needs to be brought within 6 months from the moment the consumer notified the defect to the seller.
Six years? That surely must be a maximum figure, depending on the nature of the goods involved. Something can be free of manufacturing defects, but still be reasonably expect to break after a period of use. The last sentence (about Portugal) reads oddly.
 

Mike2

Forum Supporter
This appears odd to me. UK law should not be different from EU law in this respect, and if it is different then the EU law is irrelevant. If this two year period does apply, then the large corporates (Tesco, Asda...) would be in line with it (their legal compliance departments would make sure of that).

I am sure we have many contradictory laws here in the UK. If a later law contradicts an earlier law then my understanding is that the later law takes effect and effectively repeals the earlier law.

As for big corporates being in line with EU law, it is in their interest to fob the consumer off with a more restrictive manufacturer guarantee of 1 year, pretend to offer a superior guarantee of two years (John Lewis springs to mind) or sell an expensive extended warranty (Dixons springs to mind).

Anyway, I only brought up the 2 year guarantee because the OP mentioned that the box was less than a year old and I thought he might have thought that was relevant. It is six years that is relevant now, not one year, and the seller, not the manufacturer.

As for 6 years, I would reasonably expect this sort of item to last that long, wouldn't you?

Edit: After reading the various laws, I agree with BH that the relevant law is the amendment to the SoGA made in 2002. The claim in this case should be easy, but must be made against the seller, not the manufacturer. I still feel that the large corporates have a vested interest in fobbing consumers off with a manufacturer's 1 year warranty, though. They are only too eager to tell you to "contact the manufacturer" rather than sort things out themselves.
 

Martin Creasey

New Member
Exactly the same thing has has happened to me today. Box has been working faultlessly but now it will not start up. "Nearly Ready" stays for ages and nothing happens. I see there is another forum posting about the same symptoms. Is it possible we have received a faulty software update?​
 

Mike2

Forum Supporter
Exactly the same thing has has happened to me today. Box has been working faultlessly but now it will not start up. "Nearly Ready" stays for ages and nothing happens. I see there is another forum posting about the same symptoms. Is it possible we have received a faulty software update?​


Yes. It's called "Youview."
 
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