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Buying a HDR-FOX T2

HeadlessChicken

New Member
Hi all, :)

After much consideration, I've decided to add a HDR-FOX T2 to my set-up. I live in the middle of nowhere, so finding one in a second-hand shop is unlikely. Apart from eBay, is there anywhere else I should be looking? I've got a low budget, so I'll have to wait and try to get a fairly good deal.

Thanks
 
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HeadlessChicken

HeadlessChicken

New Member
I got one on eBay today. Paid a bit more than I planned, so I hope it works well. I'll make sure to give it a good check-over as soon as it arrives.Thanks for the link Black Hole.

Also, it's worth noting that CEX's website had a few, and all their items come with a 24-Months money back warranty. I'm thinking now that maybe I should have got one from them instead. Oh well!

Are SSDs still a real no-go for the Humax? I'm planning on having this set up in my bedroom, and really even if it's quiet, I'd prefer not to have a whirring HDD.
 

NealRogersUK

New Member
SSDs are not much good for any live video application as they have a finite number of read-write operations before they start going wrong. In typical PC usage most data remains constant; typically there's only a small amount of change each day. The opposite is true in a video recording system where large amounts of data are constantly being recorded then deleted.

It shouldn't be a real problem though if you put the Humax into standby when you've finished viewing.
 

MartinLiddle

Super Moderator
Staff member
SSDs are not much good for any live video application as they have a finite number of read-write operations before they start going wrong. In typical PC usage most data remains constant; typically there's only a small amount of change each day. The opposite is true in a video recording system where large amounts of data are constantly being recorded then deleted.
All hard drives have a finite life. I agree that SSDs will have a shorter life but the last time I did the sums for a good quality modern SSD the lifetime was in excess of five years in a PVR. The only real advantage is the lack of noise but if that is important for the OP then go for it. I agree that putting the PVR into standby will be helpful when not in use will help the life of the SSD.
 

Black Hole

May contain traces of nut
The main issue I have with (modern) SSDs is the sheer cost compared with an equivalently-sized spinning disk. The cost of an SSD is justifiable in a PC because the main advantage is access speed (and for use in a portable, robustness) - for use in a PVR you would be paying for speed and robustness you don't need, and if you're going to put it in standby overnight, the silence is irrelevant (the fan makes more noise than a HDD, and properly mounted it's hardly audible).

It's a lot of wonga for a couple of dBs that are drowned out by the telly anyway.
 

Black Hole

May contain traces of nut
It was a cheap old-technology SSD, but nonetheless you should expect to be able to wear one out with long-term timeshift buffer service.
 
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