Crashing on start-up

JerryL1947

Member
As some will know, I am a new user and have little experience of running the CF programs.

I got my HDR-Fox T2 this month from Humax-Direct to replace the one died after Christmas.

I have installed the CF (1.03.12 mod 3.00) and Web-If programs and activated "auto-unprotect", "disable-dso" and "disable-ota" add-ins.

I now find I have the following crash-log
Crash-log.jpg

Jan 20 was when I installed the Web If (I think) so these are all the events since then.

Is this something I should be bothered about and/or need to cure?

I have a WD My Cloud NAS on my network but have no idea what software runs it, or how to find out. (Google??)

I have to say, there is so much information on here :thumbsup: that it is very difficult for me to find what I should best be doing. I'm no IT geek, only have limited knowledge / experience (dangerous!! I know :eek: )

My aim is to be able to keep some programs, decrypted on a USB attached HDD. I have manual retuned to a single transmitter (Walthan) except for BBC1 (StdDef - Sandy Heath) so we can get more relevant local news. This bumped East Midlands BBC1 to 800.

Need any more info?

Any advice welcome, thank you.

Jerry
 

af123

Administrator
Staff member
It's almost definitely being caused by the WD NAS on your network (although the fault is with the Humax software).
Install the dlna-filter package and the problem should go away.
 
OP
JerryL1947

JerryL1947

Member
Thanks Guys.

I had to turn on "show development and advanced packages in the Settings Advanced screen to find it.

................... and then find my NAS IP address as it had changed from the shortcut originally installed. Found it in my router.
 

Wallace

Traveler 34122
I had the same issue when I connected a new WD MyCloud NAS to my network. It was running Twonky v7.x. As stated above, use the dlna-filter package. It worked for me, although I now have a Synology NAS instead!
 
OP
JerryL1947

JerryL1947

Member
Sorry to raise this again but my Hummy has started crashing on startup, and I'm certainly not sure why.
I still have the WD Mycloud NAS and I'm using a Netgear DG834 PN wireless router. I recently installed a Netgear EX 2700 range extender.
Looking into my Hummy settings on the DNLA Server filter the media server IP address listed is that for my laptop, not the NAS. Is this my problem?
It seems my router alters its listing of "attached device" IP Adresses if new equipment is installed. Is there a way to screw down the device IP addresses so I don't have to reset these at intervals?
 

Black Hole

May contain traces of nut
If you have your network managed as DHCP (which is normal), then yes - IP addresses of your network devices will change from time to time, and this is obviously inconvenient if you have IP filtering enabled.

There are a couple of ways to deal with it. The quick and dirty solution is to pin down the IP addresses of specific devices by configuring them to use manual IP address assignments. On the HDR-FOX, for example, this is achieved by going into the Internet Setting menu and flipping the Configure IP element from "DHCP" to "Manual".

There is a "gotcha" with that - if you leave the assigned IP address as was allocated by the router by DHCP, there is a risk that when another device is introduced to your network (eg a friend brings his tablet to your house and logs on by WiFi) while the unit is turned off, the new device could be allocated that address (by DHCP) and then create a conflict when the unit is turned on. A solution is to find out what the DHCP range of your router is, and set the manual address of your device outside it (routers normally only assign a subset of the 254 available addresses by DHCP, and the range is sometimes user-configurable). This is what I do to fix the addresses of devices (that need fixing) on my network, and it leaves the DHCP system free for ad-hoc connections.

Alternatively some routers allow you to fix the IP addresses handed out to specific devices by DHCP, and to reserve those addresses for those specific devices only (devices are identified by their MAC, and typically can be given pseudonyms in the route configuration tables so they are easy to read). This means your devices can all remain in DHCP, and you then manage your network all in one place (instead of configuring each device individually). This is useful because it avoids the possibility of accidentally allocating the same address twice, but not all routers have this capability, and if you have to reset your router you will have to start all over again. However, if the device you wish to fix cannot be configured for a fixed IP address (only DHCP), this is the means you will have to use.

Glossary (click)
 
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JerryL1947

JerryL1947

Member
Thanks very much for that BH.

I will see if the router can be set up as you advise.

I'm sure you are right about the IP address assignments as this trouble seems to have started after I had help setting up the range extender which involved another laptop being admitted to the router and the Hummy would have been off. I will reset the filter to see (not see??) the NAS.
 

prpr

Well-Known Member
I still think it would be useful for dlna-filter to have whitelist capability (only allow the things you specify) as well as a blacklist capability (deny the things you specify), but that idea never found favour either. At least if there was range capability on the blacklist it would help.
 

Black Hole

May contain traces of nut
I don't think it's a case of not finding favour, more a question of getting a round (or even square) tuit.
 
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OP
JerryL1947

JerryL1947

Member
The Netgear router has an option to reserve addresses so I have set it to reserve both the NAS and Hummy addresses. I don't have that many devices connected and the Hummy is at .14 so hopefully this won't he allocated to something else now. :whistling:

Thanks again for the help.
 

Trev

The Dumb One
Limit the DNLA range DHCP pool to other than the addresses you have manually set then it can't assign a manually reserved address to another device.
I've used several Netgear routers and I was able to do this on all of them. I set the DNLA DHCP range from xxx.xxx.xxx.002 to 100 and assigned the fixed IP addresses as higher than xxx.xxx.xxx.100. (The router's base address is .001)
Edit to correct silly initialism error. DHCP
 
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prpr

Well-Known Member
there is a risk that when another device is introduced to your network while the unit is turned off, the new device could be allocated that address and then create a conflict when the unit is turned on.
The unit doesn't have to be turned off. DHCP will happily issue an address from its pool regardless of whether something configured statically within its pool is actually using it or not.
Do you mean DHCP?
Probably DCHP.
 

Trev

The Dumb One
The unit doesn't have to be turned off. DHCP will happily issue an address from its pool regardless of whether something configured statically within its pool is actually using it or not.
Does this imply that if a device is actually using a manually set (on the device) static IP address within the router's DHCP pool, the DHCP server will still issue the same IP address to another device? I don't think so. But I see no reason why it wouldn't issue it if the device was not connected/using the IP address at the time.
 

prpr

Well-Known Member
Does this imply that if a device is actually using a manually set (on the device) static IP address within the router's DHCP pool, the DHCP server will still issue the same IP address to another device?
Yes. I thought that was what I said.
I don't think so.
Why not? How would it know? The only way would be for the DHCP server to snoop all the traffic on the network. Clearly this is grossly inefficient, even if is possible at all without setting promiscuous mode on the network card. It is just not going to happen in any sane implementation.
 

MartinLiddle

Super Moderator
Staff member
I don't think so.
Why? For the record I have seen it happen several times; maybe there are implementations that are more careful but I think the common ones will hand out an IP address if the DHCP server thinks it is not allocated.
 
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