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FixDisk CloneMultiplyClaimedBlocks?

DRooster

Member
Whenever I run fix-disk it finds a lot of multiply-claimed-blocks
and seems to hang for ever (hours) after it's automatically answered YES
to the line
Clone-multiply-claimed-blocks?

Is there a starting option to answer NO to that line question?
I can't sit there waiting to pounce when that bit comes on the screen ...
 

Black Hole

May contain traces of nut
Whenever I run fix-disk it finds a lot of multiply-claimed-blocks
and seems to hang for ever (hours) after it's automatically answered YES
to the line
Clone-multiply-claimed-blocks?

Is there a starting option to answer NO to that line question?
I can't sit there waiting to pounce when that bit comes on the screen ...
I'm no expert on this, but as the experts seem to be absent at the moment...

"multiply claimed blocks" sounds like a defect to me, and the corrective action is to create duplicates of those blocks so that each block can be allocated once. "No" does not sound like an appropriate response, but if "yes" does not result in the problem being fixed (possibly due to a bug in the code which has not come out until now - this is the first time I have heard of multiply claimed blocks) I'm not sure what the answer is - leaving them as they are is not an option, IMO.

If I were in your position, with no other suggestions, I would be copying off anything I absolutely want to keep (and using the circumstances to do some housekeeping and jettison all the stuff that is saved for a rainy day that will never come) in preparation for a full disk reformat.
 
OP
D

DRooster

Member
I'll wait until someone recognises this particular problem : moving everything off the drive is a big task but doable.
Worst case I could swap in a fresh drive : surely there's a list of good compatible drives on this forum.
 

Black Hole

May contain traces of nut
Yes, it's been discussed several times, and there is the wiki: http://wiki.hummy.tv/wiki/2TB_Disk_Installation_Blog

Note that the wiki article was written before the Humax firmware became capable of formatting a 2TB drive for itself.

With a new drive installed, you could connect the old drive by USB and either access the content via Media >> Storage (blue) >> USB, or transfer the content to the new drive.
 
OP
D

DRooster

Member
If I make sure every currently-in-Humax video file has been decrypted, would those files be acessible to my PC in an enclosure?
I could swap in a fresh new hard drive and move the decrypted old stuff still on the old drive when I felt like it ... ?
 

dandnsmith

Forum Supporter
I'm pretty sure that you could then copy them, with the HDD in an enclosure.
In my experience, the multiply claimed blocks evidence crossed and corrupted chains in the file structure.
Sometimes you can work out whether one file is uncorrupted, and another has to be discarded, but I don't know a tool to do this automatically.
 

Black Hole

May contain traces of nut
If I make sure every currently-in-Humax video file has been decrypted, would those files be acessible to my PC in an enclosure?
I could swap in a fresh new hard drive and move the decrypted old stuff still on the old drive when I felt like it ... ?
What do you actually want to do?

If you want to play the recordings on the PC, sure they need to have been decrypted on the originating Humax. To play undecrypted recordings requires the originating Humax and the sidecar files (.hmt in particular) to remain with the .ts. If all you are thinking of using the PC for is as a transport mechanism to transfer recordings from the old disk to the Humax via FPT or network storage access - why bother? Might just as well plug the drive into the Humax as mentioned before.

The issue you have with plugging the drive into the PC is that it is formatted Ext3 and not directly compatible with Windows. See Things Every... (click) section 12 for details.

What bothers me is that this drive is showing symptoms of file system errors, and any messing around is only likely to make the situation worse. There is no telling whether the utility for accessing Ext3 in Windows will be able to cope with the errors it has now.
 
OP
D

DRooster

Member
All good advise : it is clearer what I should do next.
Is £50 decent price for a Seagate 1TB "CE" drive?
Current firmware can format a 2TB drive so if that's not much more dosh ...
 

MontysEvilTwin

Well-Known Member
All good advise : it is clearer what I should do next.
Is £50 decent price for a Seagate 1TB "CE" drive?
Current firmware can format a 2TB drive so if that's not much more dosh ...
I paid about £80 for a 2TB Seagate Pipeline (ST2000VM003) a while back. Amazon have them now for £73 and they are not usually the cheapest. The 2TB drives are cheaper per GB than the 1TB ones.
If you are going to replace the drive and want your recordings copied over, the easiest way is to install the new drive and copy from the old drive in a USB caddy, connected to one of the USB ports. Install the auto-unprotect package on the old drive first before replacing it. It will scan the drive and unprotect (but not decrypt) any high def. recordings.
When you have installed the new drive and formatted it you will have to reinstall the custom firmware packages again: you will get the installation web page when you open Web-If.
If you then connect the old drive to a USB port, it will mount three partitions. The second one is where the recordings are. If you copy them back to the new drive, using the remote control, the recordings will be decrypted in the process too.
 

Black Hole

May contain traces of nut
I see no particular need to install auto-unprotect, except that it will result in any HiDef recordings copied by USB to be decrypted in the process (StDef recordings will be decrypted by USB copy anyway). The recordings will play from the internal drive or an external drive whether they are decrypted or not.
 
OP
D

DRooster

Member
Good methods.
This week I arr mainly aiming to decrypt and empty the existing drive completely, then reformat.
What type of reformat does the Humax box itself do? Is it deep enough to get it properly fresh?
 

MontysEvilTwin

Well-Known Member
I see no particular need to install auto-unprotect, except that it will result in any HiDef recordings copied by USB to be decrypted in the process (StDef recordings will be decrypted by USB copy anyway). The recordings will play from the internal drive or an external drive whether they are decrypted or not.
You are correct that it is not necessary to install auto-unprotect to play the copied recordings on the same machine; I think that is clear in my original post. As the recordings are going to have to be copied from one disk to another, why not? It will take less than 5 minutes to install auto-unprotect and for it to run its full scan. OK, copying with decryption takes a bit longer than without decryption but who is going to it there watching it anyway? Then if the OP wants to copy particular recordings to a Windows PC this can be done by FTP, for example, without having to use a program (e.g. Ext2FSD) to enable the non-native Ext3 formatted drive to be used with Windows.
 
OP
D

DRooster

Member
I guess I can do a ---security-erase if after the normal Format I get odd errors after another fix-disc sometime down the line.
 

Black Hole

May contain traces of nut
You are correct that it is not necessary to install auto-unprotect to play the copied recordings on the same machine;
Of course I am correct - I practically wrote the book!

I think that is clear in my original post.
No - it says:
Install the auto-unprotect package on the old drive first before replacing it.
...with no qualification.

As the recordings are going to have to be copied from one disk to another, why not?
Equally, why? It depends what the OP wants to do with the recordings. Just installing auto-unprotect is not sufficient - although quick, it needs a little time to process the .hmt files before the drive is then removed. Check the Enc flag has been cleared (either by WebIF media browser or via the standard Media menu) on all HiDef recordings before shutting down to remove the drive. Only then will a USB copy decrypt HiDef on-the-fly.
 
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MontysEvilTwin

Well-Known Member
Of course I am correct - I practically wrote the book!
No need to be so modest, go ahead and blow your own trumpet.

I may not be the most knowledgeable here, but I have tried to help where I can. After our run in a few months ago, I took step back, said to myself that it is only a PVR forum and kept out of the regular arguments that go on here. I have now had enough. I'll only post again if I have a problem that I can't fix, and hope that the truly expert members of this forum are charitable enough to help me.

Black Hole, you have a tendency to arrogance, rudeness and condescension. You are also a bully. I'm sure you'll come back with a strong rebuttal, but I am also sure that other forum members agree with me.
 
OP
D

DRooster

Member
Just so there's nothing to argue about auto-unprotect etc : I intend this disc to be empty before reformat.
All video files are to be decrypted and copied to PC or backup drive using FileZillaFTP.
Probably on Saturday since that's when I record the least programmes off the telly.
 
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