Humax HDR110S works in non- freesat mode but not freesat mode

Rachel Cullen

New Member
I have a Humax HDR1100S which I have used successfully in my last house in freesat mode. In that house we had a satellite dish attached to the house and it all worked beautifully.

We recently moved to a brand new estate where we have a communal satellite dish and the feed comes to the house via fibre using an optical lnb. After the fibre installation was completed today my freesat box will not tune any channels in freesat mode, it fails at the postcode screen, despite acknowledging that it has 2 cables connected. However, in non-freesat mode it tunes a large number of channels.

I would really like to get freesat mode to work as I miss the guide and recording functions. Any suggestions?
 

Trev

The Dumb One
Seems that it's missing the freesat home transponder. Don't know what to suggest though, but suspect it is something to do with dish alignment or the new fangled distribution system. Do others get freesat OK?
 
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Rachel Cullen

New Member
Thank you for replying so quickly.

Using the non freesat mode I think I get good signal on the 11428H transponder, but don't receive any channels (is this what you would expect?)

I don't know whether any of the other residents have freesat working. We're the first ones in our road at the moment.
 

prpr

Well-Known Member
We recently moved to a brand new estate where we have a communal satellite dish and the feed comes to the house via fibre using an optical lnb.
Interesting...
Is this the developer's plan to stop everyone sticking dishes on their houses? Is there a covenant to stop you doing so? What about 'normal' TV aerials?
Do you know what is at the head end (the dishes and the infrastructure) and roughly how many houses it's feeding?
 
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Rachel Cullen

New Member
Interesting...
Is this the developer's plan to stop everyone sticking dishes on their houses? Is there a covenant to stop you doing so? What about 'normal' TV aerials?
Do you know what is at the head end (the dishes and the infrastructure) and roughly how many houses it's feeding?
Yes, I think it is. There is a covenant in the deeds around this.

We are allowed to put an aerial up but we're hoping the freesat equipment we already had would work without paying for the aerial installation.

In terms of the dish itself, I am wondering whether it's even on the development as the picture comes through the fibre. I don't have much information about it at all, unfortunately.
 
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Rachel Cullen

New Member
Thank you all for your replies - turns out the problem was a poor connection to the satellite port on the wall. All sorted now
 

Black Hole

May contain traces of nut
Not being an expert in satellite set-ups, I'm a bit flummoxed. As I understand it, normally the receiver has to send band and polarisation select signals to the LNB, and then you get back IF signals representing a quarter of the total input. If this is a shared installation, the selection has to occur locally and the full payload come from the "LNB" down the fibre to the local converter - and from there to the wall plate as a normal satellite LNB downlink.
 

grahamlthompson

Well-Known Member
Not being an expert in satellite set-ups, I'm a bit flummoxed. As I understand it, normally the receiver has to send band and polarisation select signals to the LNB, and then you get back IF signals representing a quarter of the total input. If this is a shared installation, the selection has to occur locally and the full payload come from the "LNB" down the fibre to the local converter - and from there to the wall plate as a normal satellite LNB downlink.

On a normal coax communal system a single quattro lnb is connected to a multiswitch (or multiswitches). A quattro lnb has 4 outputs permanently switched to each of the 4 possible combinations Low Band Vertical, Low Band Horizontal, High Band Vertical and High Band Horizontal. A tuner connected to one of the multiple outputs of the multiswitch is routed to the appropriate connection on the quattro lnb. High Band 1kHz tone on, Low Band 1kHz tone off, 12.5-14.5V vertical and 15.5-18V horizontal.

Fibre has enough bandwidth to carry all 4 combinations simultanously, A virtual quad converter or virtual quattro converter (feeds a standard multiswitch) provides the switching required to deliver the combination required for a specific channel.

It's explained on the link I posted above.
 

Black Hole

May contain traces of nut
Perhaps it is, but I didn't know what I was looking at (beyond a big lump you would need quite a large dish to overcome - no good plonking it in front of a Squarial!).

Clever stuff; the distribution system needs to split off as many fibre feeds as there are premises, and then each end point needs one of these multiswitch fibre-to-IF things (which I assume are fairly cheap). Powered from the normal LNB power out of the receiver, I presume.

Downside: no means to have multiple receivers at one address without adding another distribution end point to the infrastructure, which the occupant won't have any control over.

I take it a "quattro" LNB is different from a "quad" LNB, in that it is configured for this multi-end point arrangement?
 
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