Is this firmware abandoned now? remote streaming

MymsMan

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Thanks for looking into this. Can it not be done client side in the browser? the ip address is right there in the address bar.
Is it? I use the name humax rather than the ip address and for most other users it will be the internal ip address

The external URL should not change so it should be possible to look it up once and then stash it for future reuse (until rebooted) so the speed of the service used to find it is much less significant
 
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imanon

New Member
Yes, you are misunderstanding the problem. How would I connect to your humax from here? I need your external ip address to connect to your modem/router. Then using a port number that you have setup using port forwarding to point to your humax ip address on your local network. This can be coded into the webif by reading the ip address in the address bar and adding web/media/whatever the number of the recording is.TS onto the end.

The code to read the ip address from the browser address bar is here:
If I could add this function as an extra "stream to external" button, not to replace the current "play" button, I would. I'm hoping someone who can, will. :thumbsup:
 
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bottletop

Member
Hi, I dug out my old HDR Fox T2 out to be able to remote stream from another location. I can get it to stream by replacing the DLNA URL local address portion to the remote address, as in "local address:9000/web/media/26.TS" to "remote address:9000/web/media/26.TS" to play in VLC on my Linux pc without issue, but this is a pain to do.
Can the open in the browser VLC plugin code be removed now it doesn't work and be replaced by something that when a recorded program is clicked on, it passes the true remote location to whatever app I want my browser to use. It would be great if there was a one click solution that works on a tablet too, as this is what I want to eventually use.

Or have I missed some easy way in several days of searching here?

Thx
Maybe this isn't the option you're looking for, but why not use an old abandoned solution like a Slingbox? They use to be the in demand solution, but aren't fashionable now. So they're fairly cheap at an online auction site. It may suit others looking for this functionality. I'm not sure of the downside except having to add another consumer box to your collection. I've never wanted to stream my media across the internet myself and never had good upload speed anyway. Ironically now that fibre broadband is more common (offering better speed) the hardware is no longer on sale! Go figure ..
 
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/df

Well-Known Member
...
If I could add this function as an extra "stream to external" button, not to replace the current "play" button, I would. I'm hoping someone who can, will. :thumbsup:
The DLNA server is distinguished from the WebIf server by the use of different port numbers (9000 vs 80/443). While we can easily substitute the hostname from the WebIf page into a media link, there needs to be a way of preserving or remapping the port number that the WebIf wants to use across the NAT boundary. Given that ...

Whatever might be changed in the WebIf won't change the problem behaviour that your browser will most likely try to download the "stream" rather than playing it. Tests with files streamed by the WebIf server showed that my browser (Mozilla rv52.0) would play MP4 containing H.264 and AV1 video, MKV/WEBM containing H.264 and VP9 video. However it had no clue about other MPEG containers, in particular MPEG-TS/.ts, and I believe this will also be true of Chromeish browsers.

What can be done (ie, I have done it as a proof of concept, but without any NAT traversal) is this:
  • trivially, add .webm to the list of extensions that are shown in the Browse Files display;
  • trivially, enable the Play button in the Media Details pop-up for all listed file types;
  • make the Play button try to handle all the listed file types, using a WebIf URL for a non-TS file, as happens with unencrypted, unindexed TS files;
  • make the Play button open the link for the file in the browser, instead of trying to use the obsolete VLC plugin;
  • in the above step, use a JS fragment to substitute the hostname of the page's URL into the linked file's URL:
    Code:
         let hh = new URL(link,window.location.href);
         hh.hostname = window.location.hostname; 
         window.location.href = hh.href;
So far I just hacked this into the existing Play page, but a final version ought to be able to load the video with no interstitial page.

Would this be useful?

If so, should the video be opened in a new window/tab?

How can we get the browser to forward the URL to a helper application for the cases where it would otherwise try to download to a file?

Comments invited from all.
 
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imanon

New Member
Thanks for your work on this. Personally, leave the port 9000 intact, I have no problem in port forwarding 9000 to the Humax ip.

Abandon playing in the browser?
How can we get the browser to forward the URL to a helper application for the cases where it would otherwise try to download to a file?

Put the link in a m3u playlist file? this should trigger the browser to pass it to your video player. I've been copying the whole DNLA index column in flex view, pasting it into a text editor, using find and replace to swap the lan ip with the wan ip and removing the video/ts off the end, then saving it as a m3u playlist. Drop that into VLC and we're good to go, although without knowing what the program is until it plays.
 

/df

Well-Known Member
A further issue with the HDR-Fox T2 is that its DLNA server believes that there is a MIME type video/ts and the WebIf code has acquired this belief. The only registered MIME type for MPEG-TS is video/mp2t (RFC 3555). This corrects the WebIf, but any solution that redirects to the DLNA server will result in the client receiving Content-type: video/ts.
 

/df

Well-Known Member
With my browser (pre-WebExtensions Mozilla), I was able to load a venerable extension "MozAmPeek Streamer" which allowed me to redirect certain URL types to an external app, and so play a .ts link (actually .TS) from my HDR, using its DLNA server, in a PC application:
About add-on said:
Adds options to Firefox Download dialog to stream media files instead of downloading then opening. This allows the user to specify an unlimited number of players and assign as many file types to the players as they like.
I wonder what happens in FF85/78, Chrome-alikes, Safari?
 

MymsMan

Ad detector
A further issue with the HDR-Fox T2 is that its DLNA server believes that there is a MIME type video/ts and the WebIf code has acquired this belief. The only registered MIME type for MPEG-TS is video/mp2t (RFC 3555). This corrects the WebIf, but any solution that redirects to the DLNA server will result in the client receiving Content-type: video/ts.
Firefox has an "Open in VLC" extension available but this has never worked with the webif - hopefully this change will allow that extension to start working now.
 

/df

Well-Known Member
I've confirmed that Firefox 85 (and presumably 57+) is a toy browser that does not support adding URL handlers by configuration or by installing an extension. Essentially all you can do is something like OP's suggestion of serving a playlist file and having the browser's Download Manager open that with the desired local media player. Extensions like Open in VLC make this a 2-step procedure by shipping a native binary that passes (presumably) a file containing the URL to the player.

No doubt this also applies to the other market-leading browsers, since FF's APIs have been dumbed down to match those.
 
Maybe this isn't the option you're looking for, but why not use an old abandoned solution like a Slingbox? They use to be the in demand solution, but aren't fashionable now. So they're fairly cheap at an online auction site. It may suit others looking for this functionality. I'm not sure of the downside except having to add another consumer box to your collection. I've never wanted to stream my media across the internet myself and never had good upload speed anyway. Ironically now that fibre broadband is more common (offering better speed) the hardware is no longer on sale! Go figure ..
I agree that the Slingbox is/was a great solution, but Sling Media announced last year that they would be terminating the service in the next couple of years, hence rendering all existing Slingboxes completely useless and worthless. Very annoying :0(
 
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