Playing Files from Internal Hard Drive.

#1
Hi Guys,

I've copied files to my Humax Hard Drive for viewing on the big screen (not really big but bigger than my Tablet).

Unfortunately it doesn't quite seem to work properly.

When I get towards the end of a programme the Humax cuts off the last 20/30 seconds and starts playing the next file in the list.

So it's doing two annoying things, missing the end and playing something I don't want to watch.

I've looked in the settings but can't see an obvious fix, can anyone help with this?

Regards,

Paul
 

Black Hole

May contain traces of nut
#4
Ah, yes, but are the ends still there now copied to the Humax? In other words: I'm trying to figure out whether it's a copy problem or a playback problem.
 
#5
Ah, yes, but are the ends still there now copied to the Humax? In other words: I'm trying to figure out whether it's a copy problem or a playback problem.
Yes the ends are definitely there on the Humax.
We discovered that if we cancel playing the second file and go back to the original, it will resume play and show us the end (no idea why) but the end(s) are definitely there.
Regards,
Paul
 
#7
Everything we play !
Music Videos MP4 43,220 KB
Single episodes MKV 256,897 KB
Movies AVI 819,128 KB
Videos from Phone Mp4 17,282 KB
Paul
 
Last edited:

prpr

Well-Known Member
#8
Quoting numbers without units is pointless. Like graphs without labels/scales.
Anyway, obviously not bytes.
 
#10
All your files cannot possibly be the same size. A KB is 1024 Bytes or 1024 x 8 bits (ignoring extra parity bits). At a guess you are quoting the average bitrate which would KB per sec. Normally bitrates would be quoted in bits/second with the appropriate multiplier. eg a download speed of say 50Mbps (megabits/second) when converted to bytes would be approx 50/8 MB/sec (b is bit B is Byte).

Example your MKV assuming it is a average bitrate and not a filesize at 256,897 KB/sec when divided by 1024 gives approx 250 MB/second. A 1 hr recording at 250 MB/second will create a filesize of 250 x 3600 MB = 900,000 MB. Divide by 1024 to get GB gives approx 878 GB (or divide again by 1024 to get TB) gives you 0.85 TB. Which sounds about right for a FULL-HD 1920 x 1080 recording.

Reminds of the lady who was stopped by the police for doing 60mph in a built up area. She responded " Officer that's impossible I only left home 10 minutes ago" :eek:
 

Black Hole

May contain traces of nut
#11
Everything we play !
Music Videos MP4 43,220 KB
Single episodes MKV 256,897 KB
Movies AVI 819,128 KB
Videos from Phone Mp4 17,282 KB
Paul
I asked for exact figures, ie the number of BYTES in specific examples of files (not rounded to KB). It is not unheard of for bugs in software to terminate a file read after a specific number of bytes, but that is more likely to occur a set number of minutes into the play than a set number of minutes before the end.
 
#12
I asked for exact figures, ie the number of BYTES in specific examples of files (not rounded to KB). It is not unheard of for bugs in software to terminate a file read after a specific number of bytes, but that is more likely to occur a set number of minutes into the play than a set number of minutes before the end.
How do you know the figures are rounded to KB ? The OP hasn't specified how the figures are derived. They could be 100% accurate. Nor do we know if the content is vbr or fixed bitrate. You are making a assumption without any evidence whatsoever. How many analysis software gives a result in bytes ? Generally they will use the accurate 1024 figure. With vbr they is no way to accurately estimate the duration as the bitrate varies with the difficulty in encoding the difference between adjacent frames. Generally the greatest change between adjacent frame results in a short increase in the bitrate allocated.

The only estimate is the average bitrate of the complete recording, in the terms of your request that means nothing. :eek:

Even recordings made from digital TV use stat muxing. They allocate the total bitrate according to the content on the Mux/Transponder to each channel based on the complexity required to achieve a good result on the perceived difference between adjacent frames. A static image would use the lowest bitrate as each adjacent frame would be identical.
 
#13
Paul - in order for anyone to have a clue what exactly you have we need to know the details of what the files you actually have.

Download the free MediaInfo software appropriate to your computer.

https://mediaarea.net/en/MediaInfo/Download

Open the file in MediaInfo and select View -Tree. Elect the option to export the data to a text file and post the details to a post. That should tell Black Hole (and I) what the actual video details really are.

Start with the .MKV I posted above.
 
#16
Hi Guys,
Sorry for the delay in replying, been away for a few days.
Looks like a lot of technical stuff has been going on in my absence.
To start with the files sizes are those reported by Windows 10 on my PC, so I have no idea of the accuracy.
This "issue" occurs with every file we play "regardless of size or type" so I'm not sure a detailed analysis will help, but I'm happy to do it.
I can't run the files I originally mentioned through the MediaInfo software, as they have been watched and deleted, but I will install MediaInfo and post the results.
Regards,
Paul
 
#18
Hi Guys,
Mediainfo report as promised, I hope it makes sense.
Regards,
Paul


Unique ID : 134432081568805248397040526412456676623 (0x6522AD58E9EEE82F9430BF9538944D0F)
Complete name : Z:\Shared Videos\1) DOWNLOADS\Chicago.PD.S05E08.mkv
Format : Matroska
Format version : Version 4 / Version 2
File size : 272 MiB
Duration : 41 min 30 s
Overall bit rate : 918 kb/s
Encoded date : UTC 2017-11-30 03:44:52
Writing application : mkvmerge v9.0.1 ('Obstacles') 64bit
Writing library : libebml v1.3.3 + libmatroska v1.4.4

Video
ID : 1
Format : AVC
Format/Info : Advanced Video Codec
Format profile : High@L3.1
Format settings : CABAC / 5 Ref Frames
Format settings, CABAC : Yes
Format settings, RefFrames : 5 frames
Codec ID : V_MPEG4/ISO/AVC
Duration : 41 min 30 s
Width : 720 pixels
Height : 404 pixels
Display aspect ratio : 16:9
Frame rate mode : Constant
Frame rate : 23.976 (24000/1001) FPS
Color space : YUV
Chroma subsampling : 4:2:0
Bit depth : 8 bits
Scan type : Progressive
Writing library : x264 core 152 r2851 ba24899
Encoding settings : cabac=1 / ref=5 / deblock=1:0:0 / analyse=0x3:0x113 / me=hex / subme=8 / psy=1 / psy_rd=1.00:0.00 / mixed_ref=1 / me_range=16 / chroma_me=1 / trellis=2 / 8x8dct=1 / cqm=0 / deadzone=21,11 / fast_pskip=1 / chroma_qp_offset=-2 / threads=13 / lookahead_threads=2 / sliced_threads=0 / nr=0 / decimate=1 / interlaced=0 / bluray_compat=0 / constrained_intra=0 / bframes=3 / b_pyramid=2 / b_adapt=1 / b_bias=0 / direct=3 / weightb=1 / open_gop=0 / weightp=2 / keyint=250 / keyint_min=23 / scenecut=40 / intra_refresh=0 / rc_lookahead=50 / rc=crf / mbtree=1 / crf=19.0 / qcomp=0.60 / qpmin=0 / qpmax=69 / qpstep=4 / ip_ratio=1.40 / aq=1:1.00
Default : Yes
Forced : No
Color range : Limited
Matrix coefficients : BT.709

Audio
ID : 2
Format : AAC
Format/Info : Advanced Audio Codec
Format profile : LC
Codec ID : A_AAC-2
Duration : 41 min 30 s
Channel(s) : 2 channels
Channel positions : Front: L R
Sampling rate : 48.0 kHz
Frame rate : 46.875 FPS (1024 SPF)
Compression mode : Lossy
Delay relative to video : 20 ms
Default : Yes
Forced : No
 
#19
Basically its standard Definition 720 x 576 4:3 cropped to 16:9 transmitted 24fps progressive
Number of Bytes is 285212672. Converted to kB = 278528

1 MiB = 1024 x 1024 bytes.

Humax boxes don't play 24p content very well being restricted to 50Hz. If you have a blue-ray player with a usb port try that. Most blue-ray content is 1080p24 (or nearly 24).
 
#20
So Guys,
Now that the technical information regarding the file is available (including size to the last Byte), why do we think the Humax insists on playing the next file before this one is finished?
To be honest if it didn't automatically play the next file it would be better.
Regards,
Paul
 
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