Telnet help

BMAX

Member
A simple question that is beyond my non existent knowledge.
Once into a Telnet session, how do I navigate to the directories containing the recorded files?
I wasn't able to find anything in the Wiki.
 
D

Deleted member 473

Thanks Martin.
When I try that I get '/bin/sh: can't cd to Media/My Video'

Try

cd /

to get to the root folder. Then

cd

followed by a space and then press Tab repeatedly to cycle through all directories. You can also

cd m

followed by Tab to see all folders starting with m.

ls

will give you a directory listing. If a directory has a space in its name, the Tab will fill in any special characters you need to insert, eg, "My\ Video".
 
OP
BMAX

BMAX

Member
Thanks for the advice Mike. I now need to go out, so I will try tomorrow and report back
 

Black Hole

May contain traces of nut
A simple question that is beyond my non existent knowledge.
Once into a Telnet session, how do I navigate to the directories containing the recorded files?
I wasn't able to find anything in the Wiki.
The humax# prompt indicates the console is ready for command input, the commands being Linux shell (bash, I think) - so google "Linux commands".
 

af123

Administrator
Staff member
The humax# prompt indicates the console is ready for command input, the commands being Linux shell (bash, I think) - so google "Linux commands".
It's 'ash' and not Linux specific but close enough for pit work : )
 
OP
BMAX

BMAX

Member
Thanks for the help everyone, I am now happy.
My difficulties were not so much the commands, but the use of case, spaces and " " , of which I now have a better understanding.
 

af123

Administrator
Staff member
ash is a small implementation of the Bourne shell but with some additional features/extensions taken from ksh/bash. It's part of the busybox tools and very poorly documented (google for its documentation and all you get is posts from other people asking where to find the documentation), although most of the documentation for the Debian Ash (dash) shell is applicable.

I tend to write scripts in ksh these days as it's on all of the system types I use. It's largely bourne compatible but has some extra features and different behaviour in some instances (such as not spawning a subshell for a while loop).

Anyway, if you're going to learn a shell, learn Bourne. If you insist on learning Bash then do try and keep a handle on what is a Bash extensions versus standard Bourne and don't complain that the up arrow is broken the first time you use a pure Bourne shell!

(for my interactive sessions, I favour zsh - so many choices!)
 

Owen Smith

Active Member
Up arrow is the main reason I like bash, and I regard any shell that doesn't have it as defective.

EDIT: but I've been around long enough that I remember when the only choices were Bourne Shell, ksh or csh. Between the three of them they made me dislike unix (Linux didn't exist at the time).
 

Owen Smith

Active Member
It was that dreadful editor vi that made me dislike Unix. That and Emacs. Things are better now.

I'd almost expunged my horrifed memories of vi and emacs. It was such a relief to use nano on my Raspberry Pi, finally a sensible text terminal editor on unix. Indeed things are better now.
 
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