watching bluray stops fox t2 from recording

gettinc

New Member
Hi, sorry if this has been answered already elsewhere ( have tried searching.)

I have a hdr fox t2, Sony blue ray player (bdp s370) and lg TV(32ld490)

In the last couple if weeks, whenever I have been watching a bluray, the humax has not recorded a programme, even if I am recording and watching the same channel, switch to the bluray, and then back to the humax, there will be a gap in the recorded programme.

Really not sure what I have done to make this happen. Bit has only been since I moved house.

Has anyone else had this problem? And how did you fix it?

Thanks in advance for any help.

Chris
 

af123

Administrator
Staff member
All I can think is that your aerial cable is running near the HDMI cable from the Bluray to the TV. HDMI frequencies can interfere with the broadcast.
 

Stummery

Member
even if I am recording and watching the same channel, switch to the bluray, and then back to the humax, there will be a gap in the recorded programme.

When you say switch to the bluray do you mean by using HDMI input selection on the TV or powering the bluray player on and off ?
 

MontysEvilTwin

Well-Known Member
I had the same problem so I now use proper screened RF leads, as suggested above, even so my blu-ray player can still cause issues with the COM7 channels (BBC Four HD etc.). If you are outputting from the FOX in 1080p, switching this to 1080i might help. A lot of the high def. programmes are in 1080i anyway.
 

MontysEvilTwin

Well-Known Member
I didn't explain myself well. I was making a more general point about reducing interference. Even with screened cables, the HDR-FOX HDMI output can interfere with its own tuner. In my own case, with 1080i output, COM7 channels are usually fine, but switching to 1080p causes signal breakup. Of course this is only an issue if the box is fully on rather than in standby, but this could cause interference additional to that from the blu-ray player.
 

Black Hole

May contain traces of nut
The blu-ray is almost certainly outputting 1080p, so the radiated interference from its HDMI connection to the TV has a good chance of wiping out UHF reception if the signal is weak and/or screening is poor. When the TV switches away from the blu-ray input to the Humax input, the HDCP handshaking is lost so the blu-ray stops outputting, and the interference goes away.
 

MontysEvilTwin

Well-Known Member
When the TV switches away from the blu-ray input to the Humax input, the HDCP handshaking is lost so the blu-ray stops outputting, and the interference goes away.
Your logic is impeccable, but there must still be some signal leakage from the blu-ray even when another input is selected. I have a Sony blu-ray on a different shelf from a HDR-FOX, with all HDMI cables routed away from the double-screened RF-cables. I was watching BBC Four HD earlier. The picture was stable and artifact free. I turned on the blu-ray, the FOX quickly dropped the signal and gave the 'No programmes are being transmitted on this channel' message. This was without switching to the blu-ray input. The stronger muxes were fine, but COM7 was wiped-out.
 

ChrisDaniels

Well-Known Member
I don't think the lack of handshake would stop the output and interference. The handshake is more for the tv to decode the signal, so the signal would still exist. Some equipment will behave differently however.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Black Hole

May contain traces of nut
That's not how it works. HDMI is never encoded, the pixel data is sent plain as an uncompressed and unencrypted serial stream. HDCP is a negotiation: the source sends a cryptographic challenge, the destination has to send back the appropriate response. Only then is the full HiDef data stream permitted - otherwise it has to be cut off or fall back to StDef. There is a possibility that the HDMI link is maintained when the TV switches source, but more likely there is only one HDMI interface and its front end is multiplexed between the various input ports.

I see the consequences of these negotiations whenever I alter the routing, or bring sources and destinations on or off line, through my HDMI matrix.
 

Black Hole

May contain traces of nut
Assuming that information is accurate, we are both right. The point I was making is that if the link is broken the source stops sending and therefore the interference stops.

I am not entirely convinced: the bandwidth required of the encryption/decryption units would be enormous, and pretty much redundant if the initial negotiation is successful.
 

Snowy

New Member
I had a similar problem some time ago. I found that it was the Bluray player's mains lead that was emitting interference. Moving the aerial lead away from the mains lead helped. I put a ferrite slug around the Bluray' mains lead (as close as possible to the Bluray's back panel) a this completely cured my problem. The ferrite slug was from Maplin, part number N95AB. I have used this part on the mains lead on many of my devices now.
 

Black Hole

May contain traces of nut
That's naughty. The process of CE certification should have tested for EMC - in this case conducted emission - to ensure the player meets safety standards. "Safety" means that the unit under inspection does not mis-operate due to incoming interference (in a typical operating environment) in such a way that it is unsafe, or create interference into the environment to exceed the limits for which surrounding equipment is certified as safe.

This does not guarantee that the equipment will not mis-operate, only that it will not mis-operate in a manner as to endanger life or risk injury. However, it is normal for manufacturers to also test that their devices operate correctly within a typical operating environment and not inject unreasonable interference into the operating environment.

In summary, with adequate attention to the aerial feed, it should not be necessary to take further measures with ferrites etc - but if that's what works for you...
 

Wallace

Traveler 34122
I agree with BH.

But in this case, could Snowy's BluRay player have a fault condition that was generating the EM/RF emissions?
 
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