What Can We Do To Help?

Black Hole

May contain traces of nut
#1
I for one am not technically competent to help out with the coding and such like (not without a lot of hand-holding to start with anyway), but I feel I make a contribution by collating and prodding.

Well, here's another prod:

What do the BYTs think us lesser mortals could do to help out? I hope they might make some suggestions, but I'll start off a few ideas below.
 
OP
OP
Black Hole

Black Hole

May contain traces of nut
#2
First idea:

Non-modders could download StDef recordings directly to PC across the network (in a decrypted state) if there was a way to work out the media ID that the DLNA server uses to identify the recording file. I found XBMC exposed the media ID (it looks something like "<short_number>.TS") when I first tried it out, but that seems to have gone away and I don't know why. Maybe one of the other DLNA clients out there will do that, or provide the means to save a file instead of just playing it, even if they are incompatible with the .TS?

Here's a starting point for somebody to trawl: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_UPnP_AV_media_servers_and_clients#UPnP_AV_clients
 
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Black Hole

Black Hole

May contain traces of nut
#3
Second idea:

The encryption method and keys are probably buried in the Broadcomm chip in the Humax. It should be possible to analyse an encrypted file and the equivalent decrypted file to work out the encryption method and the key (for any particular Humax) - the only real diffuiculty is lack of data, and with a block-encrypted video file there is a huge amount of data! Somebody could scour the Internet for information (and cross-check it) or utilities that will do that.
 

af123

Administrator
Staff member
#5
The encryption method and keys are probably buried in the Broadcomm chip in the Humax.
Yes, they are within a hardware security module and cannot be extracted as far as we know without resorting to something like JTAG.

It should be possible to analyse an encrypted file and the equivalent decrypted file to work out the encryption method and the key (for any particular Humax) - the only real diffuiculty is lack of data, and with a block-encrypted video file there is a huge amount of data!.
Unfortunately not. Knowing the input and output data for an encryption algorithm does not enable you to find the key any faster, you still need to brute force it. The algorithm is likely to be either AES-128 or 3DES and somebody on here said that the FoxSAT uses 3DES so I would imagine the T2 does too.
 
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OP
Black Hole

Black Hole

May contain traces of nut
#6
Fair enough. We don't need it for the HDR of course, but knowledge of the encryption would have enabled HD-FOX users to release their recordings without booting HDR-mode.
 
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OP
Black Hole

Black Hole

May contain traces of nut
#7
Just a note that XNMC or Kinsky Desktop would be the best uPnP clients to check, as they are cross-platform.
I wouldn't know where to start, but I notice XBMC (I assume that's what you mean) is open source, so presumably somebody in the know could make it display the media IDs when browsing the server, and I wouldn't think it would be too difficult (just adding a variable to an output line perhaps).
 
#8
The solution to getting the media ID from XBMC turns out to be really easy. I use a Mac, so I don't know where the relevant file would be on a PC.

XBMC produces a log file, and the ID is in that, and can easily be read off by eye. Alternatively, it should not be difficult to create a program that extracts it, since one could grep for a string beginning http and ending ts.

I'm having some problems with the decrypted file, which I will comment on in the other thread.

Oh, I see that this solution had been found a short while ago in the other thread.
 
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