wireless SD cards - do they work with the HDR-Fox T2

marada

New Member
With the wifi dongle installed (don't have one yet) on the HDR-FOX T2 has anyone had any luck accessing a camera wifi card such as the Toshiba FlashAir http://www.amazon.co.uk/Toshiba-Flash-Class-Wireless-Memory/dp/B00DR590OM

The Toshiba FlashAir cant be accessed via a web browser, so would this work with the browser that can be installed with the customer firmware?

I know I could just plug a usb SD card reader into the HDR-Fox T2 or transfer the photos to my network, however it would be great if I could get it working wirelessly direct from the camera.
 

Black Hole

May contain traces of nut
Nobody has tried as far as I know, and I would bet my house that there is nothing that could be done out-of-the-box.

These wireless cards create a WiFi hot-spot and a web server so that a web browser on a device linked to the hot-spot can view photos formatted as web pages, with the option to download to a PC or whatever. In order to link the Humax to it, you would have to change the WiFi credentials on the Humax to stop accessing your normal home network (through which it gains access to the Internet) and switch to the wireless card hot-spot, bearing in mind that the wireless card credentials could prove difficult or impossible to enter into the Humax. Then, when you have finished with the photos, you will have to revert the Humax to your home network again. All rather a faff compared with sticking it up the USB.

Let's suppose we do link to the wireless card and the connection works. What then? The native Humax firmware offers no means to view what the web server on the card is offering. The standard photo viewer expects to see files somewhere in the file system (and isn't very good at displaying what it does find). To make that work, somebody would have to write or adapt a driver that could see the camera photos across the WiFi network and present them to the operating system as a virtual USB drive (this might not be too difficult if the wireless card has NAS capability).

The other approach would be an addition to the custom TV Portal so that an "app" can browse the wireless card's web server.
 
OP
M

marada

New Member
Nobody has tried as far as I know, and I would bet my house that there is nothing that could be done out-of-the-box.

In order to link the Humax to it, you would have to change the WiFi credentials on the Humax to stop accessing your normal home network (through which it gains access to the Internet) and switch to the wireless card hot-spot, bearing in mind that the wireless card credentials could prove difficult or impossible to enter into the Humax. Then, when you have finished with the photos, you will have to revert the Humax to your home network again. All rather a faff compared with sticking it up the USB.
.

Well my house is wired with gigabit ethernet in every room. Could I not just connect the Humax with ethernet cable, then it would have no need to access any wifi network at home. The only wifi it would connect to would be the camera.
 

Black Hole

May contain traces of nut
You would still have to switch the Humax from wired to WiFi and back again. It can't be connected to both at the same time.
 
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Owen Smith

Active Member
Why can't these camera cards join an existing wireless network? I have an Olympus E-M10 and it has built in wifi but again it creates a hotspot, which is a pain in the neck to use because you have to disconnect from whatever you were already using. I seriously wonder how computer literate the people designing these solutions are, if they used them with a real setup they would surely find the cameras as frustrating as their customers do.
 

Black Hole

May contain traces of nut
Ditto various other devices which provide external connectivity via WiFi as an alternative to Bluetooth. Creating a hot spot requires no user input - otherwise an interface would have to be available to configure WiFi connection credentials.
 

Owen Smith

Active Member
They do, but you apply that at the client end. The SSID and password are predefined.

In the case of my Olympus E-M10 camera, the SSID and password are randomly generated when you first enable the feature in the camera. This prevents people knowing what the SSID and password might be and hijacking your pictures through the hot spot. Also the camera displays a large QR code on it's LCD so you don't have to type the SSID or password into your device. This even works on iOS (the only time it has for me), the iOS and Android apps for the camera read the QR code and connect to the camera's hot spot. Then you can transfer pictures, or take control of the camera remotely (including taking pictures), or transfer GPS tag information.
 

Owen Smith

Active Member
Ditto various other devices which provide external connectivity via WiFi as an alternative to Bluetooth. Creating a hot spot requires no user input - otherwise an interface would have to be available to configure WiFi connection credentials.

My Olympus E-M10 camera has two thumbwheels, about 8 buttons, and a fair sized touch sensitive LCD which could display a keypad of some type. I claim it has more than sufficient user input options to pick an SSID or type one in and then type in the password. Also the camera has a USB interface, so there's no reason technically that you couldn't connect a USB keyboard for typing this stuff in for those occasions you have access to a keyboard.

Also, it's a camera. It could easily read QR codes for SSID and password for those systems that can generate them.
 

Black Hole

May contain traces of nut
In the case of my Olympus E-M10 camera, the SSID and password are randomly generated when you first enable the feature in the camera.
That's one way of predefining it I suppose, but it seems unnecessarily complicated. There does not seem to me to be anything wrong with the typical mechanism where the device has a fixed (but unique) password that is detailed in the paperwork. But I agree, there are situations where I would prefer these devices to connect to an existing network.
 

Owen Smith

Active Member
That's one way of predefining it I suppose, but it seems unnecessarily complicated. There does not seem to me to be anything wrong with the typical mechanism where the device has a fixed (but unique) password that is detailed in the paperwork. But I agree, there are situations where I would prefer these devices to connect to an existing network.

You can also make it generate a new SSID and password should you wish to stop using the old ones. In case they've been compromised is the only good reason I can think of.
 

Owen Smith

Active Member
But how many do? My router certainly doesn't.

Different solutions should be used for devices with different capabilities. My camera has plenty of input options so should be able to join an existing network with little difficulty. There's nothing to stop it having the option to do it either way round.
 
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