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Distributing Humax Output by UHF

peterpi

Member
I view lots of content using a UHF modulator and sent via a coax cable to my workshop. The loss of video quality on a large screen, and more so the audio, is quite noticeable. Is the answer video over Ethernet or can you suggest any other solutions. I've disconnected the UHF IN feed, as it was almost impossible to find a frequency which did not have some vestige of carrier on it.

Thanks again
Pete
 
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Black Hole

May contain traces of nut

Trev

The Dumb One
I view lots of content using a UHF modulator and sent via a coax cable to my workshop. The loss of video quality on a large screen, and more so the audio, is quite noticeable. Is the answer video over Ethernet or can you suggest any other solutions.
Is the modulator digital or analogue?
You will get no loss of quality if you use a digital modulator. (and as a bonus, you can tune it in without changing the TV from D to A and back every time.
Downside is they are quite a bit more expensive than analogue ones.
Advantages are high quality and if you 'plug it into' your RF distribution system, you can get the result on all connected TVs.
 
OP
peterpi

peterpi

Member
Is the modulator digital or analogue?
You will get no loss of quality if you use a digital modulator. (and as a bonus, you can tune it in without changing the TV from D to A and back every time.
Downside is they are quite a bit more expensive than analogue ones.
Advantages are high quality and if you 'plug it into' your RF distribution system, you can get the result on all connected TVs.
It is an analogue modulator. I assume the input will still be SCART? I must do something about it.
 
OP
peterpi

peterpi

Member
These threads will probably be of interest (result of a forum search):

https://hummy.tv/forum/threads/problems-using-hdmi-over-cat5-extender.6387/

https://hummy.tv/forum/threads/watching-recordings-on-a-2nd-tv.8646/post-121593

https://hummy.tv/forum/threads/remote-control.3452/post-41092

By the way, I currently run a projector from HDMI via a matrix selector over 10m of decent HDMI cable perfectly OK (subsequent to some of those posts).
Thanks again. Its a bit far for using HDMI. Too many holes in walls and bits of trunking which are too small for the HDMI connectors and although I could I don't fancy cutting soldering and heat shrinking a joint with seventeen conductors.
 
OP
peterpi

peterpi

Member
For a digital modulator? No, HDMI. However, they are not just "quite a bit more expensive", they are very expensive and typically only used for commercial distribution systems.
I'll take a view. No pun intended.
 
OP
peterpi

peterpi

Member
For a digital modulator? No, HDMI. However, they are not just "quite a bit more expensive", they are very expensive and typically only used for commercial distribution systems.
See what you mean about expensive! Soldering and heat shrinking seventeen conductors just became more attractive.
 
OP
peterpi

peterpi

Member
HDMI over Cat5-8-7 from £32.00. I've got a couple of HDMI splitters and at that price I might give it a go.
 

Trev

The Dumb One
I was thinking of something like I have similar to THIS That's only 'quite a bit' more expensive. What the hell were you thinking of?
Set to LCN800 (renumbered to LCN8 on the TVs) on a free RF channel and fed via a splitter in reverse into my dist amp along with the Freeview signal from the aerial. I actually use it on the output from my HDR Fox T2 so I can watch recordings on any of my plethora (3) TVs. Simples.
 

Black Hole

May contain traces of nut
To me, £175 counts as very expensive. Until now, I had no idea anybody here actually has one. It is a neat solution though, assuming all the TVs are fed from the same aerial.
 

Trev

The Dumb One
To me, £175 counts as very expensive.
I found the one that I actually bought from Amazon cost £119.99 lasty October. It doesn't have a channel change facility, but as I use it with my T2 with the CF, that is not a problem for me.
The ones with IR repeaters are not a lot more expensive.
It is a neat solution though, assuming all the TVs are fed from the same aerial.
Only if you need the mod to appear on all TVs. Much neater tghan having to drill holes to feed an HDMI cable through? HERE'S the one that I bought still £119.99
 
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Black Hole

May contain traces of nut
Much neater tghan having to drill holes to feed an HDMI cable through?
It seems to me to boil down to this: there is no need to distribute a DVB signal from the HDR-FOX if there is an alternative means of accessing its content - there is no need to use it as a tuner because the aerial signal can be sent the same way, and if the client TV lacks a digital tuner the DVB modulation is no use anyway (job for a cheap analogue modulator). So were left with the HDR-FOX only being a recorded content provider in this situation.

If the infrastructure is already there, or it is desired to serve multiple remote TVs, then £100+ on a HDMI to DVB-T might be economic. For only one TV, it will be a lot cheaper to provide it with a network media player and a network connection (WiFi doesn't even need a Cat5!). That way, the recorded content can be accessed completely independently of whatever else the HDR-FOX is doing.
 
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OP
peterpi

peterpi

Member
I was thinking of something like I have similar to THIS That's only 'quite a bit' more expensive. What the hell were you thinking of?
Set to LCN800 (renumbered to LCN8 on the TVs) on a free RF channel and fed via a splitter in reverse into my dist amp along with the Freeview signal from the aerial. I actually use it on the output from my HDR Fox T2 so I can watch recordings on any of my plethora (3) TVs. Simples.
The one I as looking at was almost £500 with all duties and VAT paid! What you've suggested is far more reasonable.

Thanks
 

Trev

The Dumb One
@Black Hole But peterpi already watches TV in his workshop via an analogue mod. Getting a digital mod will solve his quality problem without any change to his RF distribution infrastructure, with no more cabling or hole drilling involved.

@peterpi I did not use an HDMI splitter either, I just feed the T2 HDMI directly into the mod and tune my TV to the mod output.
I don't even have to change inputs on the TV to watch it, just select LCN8. What could be more convenient?
pererpi has mentioned SCART, and the mod won't work with SCART . Apart from that, SCART would be SD only.

The only problem that I had was that the mod output was a lot higher that the 'off air' signals, even when 'turned right down', causing minor pixellation of 'off air' content. A variable attenuator in the mod output to 'balance them out' and an RF channel change further away from the 'off air' transmissions sorted that out PDQ.

My highest 'off air' is CH 30 so I put the mod at CH 43 (for reasons best known to myself. i.e. one that I chose at random)
 
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OP
peterpi

peterpi

Member
I found the one that I actually bought from Amazon cost £119.99 lasty October. It doesn't have a channel change facility, but as I use it with my T2 with the CF, that is not a problem for me.
The ones with IR repeaters are not a lot more expensive.Only if you need the mod to appear on all TVs. Much neater tghan having to drill holes to feed an HDMI cable through? HERE'S the one that I bought still £119.99
The £120 will do for me as I don't have a spare remote and use CFW to control the T2.
 
OP
peterpi

peterpi

Member
It seems to me to boil down to this: there is no need to distribute a DVB signal from the HDR-FOX if there is an alternative means of accessing its content - there is no need to use it as a tuner because the aerial signal can be sent the same way, and if the client TV lacks a digital tuner the DVB modulation is no use anyway (job for a cheap analogue modulator). So were left with the HDR-FOX only being a recorded content provider in this situation.

If the infrastructure is already there, or it is desired to serve multiple remote TVs, then £100+ on a HDMI to DVB-T might be economic. For only one TV, it will be a lot cheaper to provide it with a network media player and a network connection (WiFi doesn't even need a Cat5!). That way, the recorded content can be accessed completely independently of whatever else the HDR-FOX is doing.
I do only use it for recorded stuff, and the client TV is almost always used as a monitor attached to a mini PC (like it is now). So worth considering.
 
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Black Hole

May contain traces of nut
I do only use it for recorded stuff, and the client TV is almost always used as a monitor attached to a mini PC (like it is now). So worth considering.
Assuming the PC is on the network then, it's a free solution. VLC and you're done. Otherwise, £20 on a media streamer or a Raspberry Pi could have sorted it. So much for DVB distribution!
 
OP
peterpi

peterpi

Member
I've ordered a video over CAT5 Tx & Rx system, £35 from Amazon. I don't suppose these will work through a router and a switch, but I'll find out when I get it and post an update.
 

Black Hole

May contain traces of nut
No it definitely won't. It's not using Ethernet to communicate, just the impedance-controlled Cat5 cable point-to-point.
 
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