Only 0.4V at LNB 1/2 Input Sockets on Back of Foxsat HDR. Is this a fault ?

Black Hole

May contain traces of nut
Unless you are some kind of masochist you have done enough to demonstrate the Foxsat is broken. You do not need to prove whether the LNB is good - don't postulate double faults until there is no alternative explanation.

Replace your Foxsat (on the second hand market, or with a current model), then see whet's what.
 
OP
M

Mechnical Al

New Member
Update & conclusion; Purely by coincidence, just the other day, I was relocating a spare bedroom TV from stand mounted to wall mounted when I noticed it had a satellite reception socket, allowing me to conduct some diagnosis by substitution. With TV selected as the input source, and a DMM connected...the socket powers up and provides 18.5v. I connected the TV to the satellite antenna, and it accomplished an autotune OK, with none of the nonsense about asking for a postcode, despite never having been connected to the antenna before. It discovered 761 channels, and did exactly the same on the other second LNB connector. I sample viewed a few channels, all fine. On that basis it seems both lanes of the antenna system are fully operational, therefore the fault must lie within the Humax Foxsat receiver, and it's inability to supply power to the antenna.

Can anyone recommend a good company for repairing Humax receivers, as Humax don't deal with this model anymore? Cheers, Allan
 

Black Hole

May contain traces of nut
Can anyone recommend a good company for repairing Humax receivers
I'm not aware of any, but the cost is likely to be prohibitive. Consumer electronics is so cheap isn't generally worth repairing any more, therefore the skills to do it have been lost*.

My recommendation remains the same:
Replace your Foxsat (on the second hand market, or with a current model)

* Footnote:

I'm currently trying to fault-find a HDR-FOX which won't power up when it has a HDD connected (see https://hummy.tv/forum/threads/start-up-fails-when-hdd-connected.10164/). Internal voltages are fine without the HDD, but one of the supply rails collapses when it tries to drive a load. The work is very much hampered by not having a circuit diagram and thus having to use educated guesswork and probing to deduce the circuit in that area of the board only, aided by having a working one to compare voltages etc.

Were I looking at it, I would find it more difficult to make progress with your Foxsat because I don't have a working reference. Also, the area of circuit involved might be hidden inside a metal can.
 

grahamlthompson

Well-Known Member
Update & conclusion; Purely by coincidence, just the other day, I was relocating a spare bedroom TV from stand mounted to wall mounted when I noticed it had a satellite reception socket, allowing me to conduct some diagnosis by substitution. With TV selected as the input source, and a DMM connected...the socket powers up and provides 18.5v. I connected the TV to the satellite antenna, and it accomplished an autotune OK, with none of the nonsense about asking for a postcode, despite never having been connected to the antenna before. It discovered 761 channels, and did exactly the same on the other second LNB connector. I sample viewed a few channels, all fine. On that basis it seems both lanes of the antenna system are fully operational, therefore the fault must lie within the Humax Foxsat receiver, and it's inability to supply power to the antenna.

Can anyone recommend a good company for repairing Humax receivers, as Humax don't deal with this model anymore? Cheers, Allan
 

Black Hole

May contain traces of nut
How do you know these are a "good company" as specified by the OP, or did you just google it? Maybe they've seen the problem before and know straight away what it is and what to do about it, but if they don't £55 doesn't cover much investigation. As their blurb states:
We offer a No Fix – No Fee policy
...which means you pay £8-ish to ship the item, they tell you they can't fix it, and then you either abandon it or it costs you £15 to get it back.

Or you put that money towards a replacement.
 

grahamlthompson

Well-Known Member
How do you know these are a "good company" as specified by the OP, or did you just google it? Maybe they've seen the problem before and know straight away what it is and what to do about it, but if they don't £55 doesn't cover much investigation. As their blurb states:

...which means you pay £8-ish to ship the item, they tell you they can't fix it, and then you either abandon it or it costs you £15 to get it back.

Or you put that money towards a replacement.


There are posts on My Humax from members who have used the service and been very pleased including a very recent one. The boxes were returned with recordings intact.

 
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