HDR Fox T2 File ts Editing

Putting any type of video file back on the Hummy for me seems like a waste of time, just use an external usb harddrive formatted to ntfs plug it in and the Hummy has played anything decent I've tried. Editing features described in previous posts are really for those of us who want properly edited videos to save / archive write to dvd/bluray, if you are just going to watch once there's no need to edit, just ff through the adverts and then delete. I guess if you have a 1TB Hummy you could use it for achival purposes I suppose. The ultimate for me will be a blueray recorder attached to my hummy in place of my current dvd recorder. My current interest in this post has been to achieve hi def editing and thereby preserve the high definition resolution and be able to save it/archive it, which AVS Video Editor does for me quickly and without crashing on what is a 5 year old cheap laptop. When all said and done a .ts file is only a mpeg file anyways, just change the .ts extension. If you want the ts extension just change it back after saving to mpeg, haha, just joking. These external harddrives are very cheap these days, so just use the hummy to do your recording and reserve your attached usb harddrive for all your saved videos/dvd etc the best of both worlds. I think I'll close on this one now and let others have the last word.
PS. AVS loads .mkv and loads and saves mpeg-4 contrary to others comments!!!!
 
Has anyone tried Avidemux which is free and open source?
Avidemux is a free video editor designed for simple cutting, filtering and encoding tasks. It supports many file types, including AVI, DVD compatible MPEG files, MP4 and ASF, using a variety of codecs. Tasks can be automated using projects, job queue and powerful scripting capabilities.
Avidemux is available for Linux, BSD, Mac OS X and Microsoft Windows under the GNU GPL license. The program was written from scratch by Mean, but code from other people and projects has been used as well. Patches, translations and even bug reports are always welcome.
 
I guess requirements - and the thinking behind them - vary from person to person. I do have a 1TB Hummy, and several more TB connected via my media PC. In addition, if I want an archive version of something special, I can pretty much always find a well-executed rip online and download it in a few minutes. So I don't really need to be able to do any of this. It's a hobbyist thing. For years, I saved anything with ads in it on my media PC using Windows Media Centre and edited out the ads with VideoRedo before viewing (I have a pathological dislike of adverts :(). In SD this was the work of moments and I felt a lot of satisfaction at being able to view 'clean' programming. Now I'd like to be able to do it with HD material, but it's proving to be unexpectedly challenging.
 

Black Hole

May contain traces of nut
I should make clear here, my personal requirement is as follows:
1) ability to edit rubbish out of Humax HD .ts files and put them back on the Humax, where they will play with ff/rwd AND be able to play them on the PC, preferably with Splash Player. And to do this quickly!
2) ability to transcode occasionally to 720p .mkv or .mp4 files from the above for archiving.
I would add to that list: the ability to transcode to something compatible with writing to DVD, just occasionally.
 
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oijonesey

oijonesey

Hummy.tv SEO Guru
Has anyone tried Avidemux which is free and open source?
Yup it was one of the first ones I reported on in the first post - for me I could never get the audio sync to work properly - no matter what I did it was always behind.

In terms of requirements - it's just the ability to strip out the lead ins/out and adverts from the kids shows so when I chain consecutive episodes or leave a film on then it's continuous play and the kids don't come asking for the latest cheap japanese crap toys!!!!!! Oh and I'd like all this for free please!! Actually I'll pay for decent software if it does what I'm looking for. As I've said before VideoRedo seems to set the standard but as we know it ain't cheap hence my search continues...
 
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oijonesey

oijonesey

Hummy.tv SEO Guru
Couple of updates:

I emailed FreeMake asking for Transport Stream support and offered them a sample HD file to play with. They replied to say it would be added to their suggestion list so whilst I'm not expecting immediate results "if you don't ask, you won't get".

Secondly I stumbled across a couple of useful looking pages in Wikipedia as follows
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_video_editing_software#High_definition_import
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_video_editing_software

Although they don't list VideoRedo which surprised me. But they did remind me of Openshot which I was playing with as part of the Linux package I'd found (LiVES) so I may go back and try that some more.

Finally I'd seen someone note about the support for Nvidia CUDA - I'd not given this much consideration as my laptop is about 4 years old now but I went to the Nvidia site and checked for updates and sure enough my card can support it but I was way behind on the firmware version so if you do have an Nvidia card might be worth forcing a check. It claims to be able to make a difference with H264 formats so fingers crossed.
 
I just revisited VideoRedo H264. I have to say that this program is just so much better than anything else I've seen that I may have to bite the bullet and shell out £60 for it.
A few miscellaneous observations:
- I've noticed that Freemake doesn't always play nicely with Hummy .ts files, but seems quite happy with the edited .ts output files from VRD.
- VRD is much slower than Freemake at transcoding. Transcoding a 5-minute clip from a Hummy .ts takes 16 minutes using VRD on my laptop. Recoding the .ts output file from VRD with Freemake takes only 6 minutes (720p mkv)
- If you return a VRD-processed .ts file to the Hummy, the skip controls work and playback can be resumed from the Hummy menu. However ff and rwd do not work.
- The file I was working with ('The Great British Food Revival') needed audio adjustment of -170ms for the output to stay in sync. I don't yet know if this slippage occurs with all Hummy files.
 
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oijonesey

oijonesey

Hummy.tv SEO Guru
I just revisited VideoRedo H264. I have to say that this program is just so much better than anything else I've seen that I may have to bite the bullet and shell out £60 for it
I know what you mean - I'm sure the time I've spent looking for alternatives to VRD is worth more than the £60 quid to buy it!! Nevertheless before you reach for your card details I have another couple of suggestions but I've only read their websites - I haven't tried these at home yet (hopefully there'll be time tonight)

Smart Cutter for DVB - http://www.fame-ring.com/index.html - claims to be "The world's first H.264 AVCHD MPEG2 frame accurate cutter without re-encoding!" and it's only $40 dollars so might save a couple of quid over VRD. Specifically mentions TS file and H264 support.

The other one was www.dvdvideosoft.com - they offer a large range of free programs for all sorts of jobs but again, I have only read about this on their site and not tried it at home myself yet. However I searched hummy.tv for this web address and someone on the 9200 thread has tried this here http://www.hummy.tv/forum/threads/how-to-burn-recording-ts-file-on-pc-to-dvd.90/page-2#post-2468 but I suspect it'll only do SD files.

I was surprised to see you report that VRD was slower than Freemake - when I had the trial version that allowed 10 minute files I trimmed my whole Fireman Sam collection (about 40 episodes) in no time at all - they loaded in seconds, edited quickly and then saved in seconds also. But I haven't noticed any audio issues but then again they were only SD not HD.

Will report back on Smart Cutter and the stuff from dvdvideosoft as soon as I can.
 
I have never seen VRD take longer than 3 or 4 minutes to output a file using the same output format as input. Any change involving significant recoding comes up with a warning. Not a clue how fast it is at recoding 1080i(H264) to 576i (mpeg2) for DVD though.

As an example it output the Royal Wedding coverage after removing the ads (1920 x 1080 Ex ITV1-HD Granada satellite sourced) very quickly in 1080i for archive to blu-ray
 
I was surprised to see you report that VRD was slower than Freemake - when I had the trial version that allowed 10 minute files I trimmed my whole Fireman Sam collection (about 40 episodes) in no time at all - they loaded in seconds, edited quickly and then saved in seconds also. But I haven't noticed any audio issues but then again they were only SD not HD.
Sorry, I was unclear - you're both quite correct. If you save back as a H264 .ts file with the same parameters as the Hummy input file, VRD is very quick because it doesn't transcode. If you do select an option that requires transcoding, such as saving to a 720p .mkv file, it is much slower than Freemake. Logically, if you wanted to change the file format, you'd edit in VRD, quick save in the same format as the original, and then use something like Freemake to transcode the result. Less elegant, but much faster.

(Actually, VRD's attempt at producing a .mkv file was pretty much pants, anyway...)
 
Smart Cutter for DVB - http://www.fame-ring.com/index.html - claims to be "The world's first H.264 AVCHD MPEG2 frame accurate cutter without re-encoding!" and it's only $40 dollars so might save a couple of quid over VRD. Specifically mentions TS file and H264 support.
Eek! What to say about this program? Take a look at the website and you'll have a good idea what the software looks like. I'd say it looks like a dog's breakfast, but it would give my dog a fit!

First of all, it doesn't install in Program Files - it creates a folder in C:\. It doesn't have a proper uninstaller (have Revo standing by). It creates a desktop icon but no entry in the Windows program list. On installation it runs a file manager 'helper', but it's subsequently impossible to return to it. Its help file bears little resemblance to the current software and its interface appears to have been designed by a (probably Russian, to judge by the on-screen text) school kid.

And the worst thing is, it actually works. Sort of. If you work with a single file you can select the bits you want to keep, add them to a clip list, and then resave the files. The editor and the file save are quick. It looks like it should work with multiple files, but if you try all sorts of things go wrong.

Interestingly, one other thing that seems not to work is the watermarker, that's supposed to mark output files from unregistered copies of the program. So if you can live with its weirdness, you can probably do it for free.;)

Definitely a work in progress by someone who may one day be a programmer. In the meantime, beware. You have been warned!:eek:
 
The other one was www.dvdvideosoft.com - they offer a large range of free programs for all sorts of jobs but again, I have only read about this on their site and not tried it at home myself yet. However I searched hummy.tv for this web address and someone on the 9200 thread has tried this herehttp://www.hummy.tv/forum/threads/how-to-burn-recording-ts-file-on-pc-to-dvd.90/page-2#post-2468 but I suspect it'll only do SD files.
As you say, nothing obviously interesting for HD files.
 
Sorry, I was unclear - you're both quite correct. If you save back as a H264 .ts file with the same parameters as the Hummy input file, VRD is very quick because it doesn't transcode. If you do select an option that requires transcoding, such as saving to a 720p .mkv file, it is much slower than Freemake. Logically, if you wanted to change the file format, you'd edit in VRD, quick save in the same format as the original, and then use something like Freemake to transcode the result. Less elegant, but much faster.
When it comes to video encoding, faster usually means lower quality.

The tests I did with Freemake reducing to 720p were awful - unwatchably bad.
 
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