Assume v. Presume

MikeSh

Well-Known Member
Reducing the number of syllables does not make it right.
I didn't say it does.
I was just saying that it is to be expected (logically, and I know human behaviour is often not logical) that where the same of anything can be achieved with less resources then the lower resource solution is likely to be preferred. Just one aspect of 'common use'.
 

MikeSh

Well-Known Member
But both the above usages are in the past tense, so either is correct as far as I can see.
Yes, I think so. But if you put them in a context one may 'fit' better. Eg, tack "and a loud motorbike went past." on the end and the first one seems to work better. Tack "My feet were sore so " on the front and the second works better.
Although I'm sure people use both forms, I can't help feeling something is wrong with the first. It just doesn't sit right. :D
See above :)
 
OP
OP
Black Hole

Black Hole

May contain traces of nut
The reason for my original comment is the frequently misused form of the type "he was sat in the waiting room". In fact, I rarely seem to hear the correct passive form of the verb these days.
 
I've searched to see if this has been mentioned before and can't find it - but I'll put on my asbestos suit, just in case...

Am I the only one who gets annoyed with the slack use of the term kilo to mean kilogramme? [aside: I was taught to spell it gramme not gram]. As stated on other threads kilo means a thousand. "I'll have a kilo of potatoes, please". "You really want a thousand spuds?".
The current annoying Morrisons advert with turkey £7 per kilo - great value! A thousand turkeys for £7. I've not got enough space in the freezer.

There is an old joke which someone has attributed to Tommy Cooper:
http://www.mkccc.com/humour/t.htm said:
A man walks into a greengrocer's and says, I want five pounds of potatoes please.
And the greengrocer says, we only sell kilos.
So the man says, all right then, I'll have five pounds of kilos.
 
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