Assume v. Presume

OP
Black Hole

Black Hole

May contain traces of nut
For what it's worth, I thought "matt" is an adjective for something not shiny, while "matte" is a kind of mask used in art and film making. Curiously, my 1981 Chambers Family Dictionary (if you want to know whether a dictionary is USA-based just check whether it has an entry for "colour" or "color") defines "matt" as "see mat", and has an entry meaning "dull" listed as "mat(t)" (ie an optional double t). It contains no entry for "matte" nor lists the mask meaning under any other similar entry.
 

EEPhil

Number 28
Re: US books...

Whilst agreeing with the Publishers [sic] Association comments about what drives Brits bonkers, this ship has sailed already.
I've seen many cheap books in those pop-up book stores that used to exist. (Are there still some?). Many used US spellings, some for novels written by English authors or translated into American (usually) from other languages. Reluctantly, I can cope with their dodgy spellings, cookies, sweaters (eh? surely this is common in the UK) and sidewalks. Pavement, on the other hand, means different things to different people.

It is annoying to have British English text translated into American English. I've told the story here before - I co-wrote a scientific paper in British English only to have it translated into American English for an IEEE journal. On the other hand, many American English texts were allowed into UK journals as written.

Strangely enough, I have one British authored book in an American edition, bought at the Munich Main Railway Station, where -ise still exists in the text. Maybe all is not lost. :unsure:
 

MikeSh

Well-Known Member
I co-wrote a scientific paper in British English only to have it translated into American English for an IEEE journal. On the other hand, many American English texts were allowed into UK journals as written.
Of course. In one case 63% of Britons would be annoyed, in the other 63% of Americans would grab an assault rifle and go hunt down the author/publisher. :)
 

EEPhil

Number 28
Slightly off the current topic. I noticed a while back that some American documentaries and similar subtitle some UK English speakers so the Americans can understand them. Very rarely, if ever, seen the reverse. I have seen UK news outlets subtitle a perfectly understandable (to me) UK regional accent. I suppose this almost makes sense as most of BBC News now forms part of the World News (cutbacks) and Sky News is available all over the place.
 

everthewatcher

Forum Supporter
I noticed a while back that some American documentaries and similar subtitle some UK English speakers so the Americans can understand them. Very rarely, if ever, seen the reverse.
Agreed. It does amuse when you see a US-sourced prog subtitle a mild UK regional accent when we seem to have no trouble with US ones without them.
 

EEPhil

Number 28
water made acidic by the carbon and sulphur in the gas supply, so it has to be discharged to the foul water sewer.
:thumbsup: Glad to see someone using the spelling sulphur and not the current preferred usage with an f. I’m not changing the spelling of my name to phit in with it. :D
 
OP
Black Hole

Black Hole

May contain traces of nut
Yes, I checked the sources and discovered 'sulfur' is the "approved" spelling these days... but it doesn't look right.
 

gomezz

Well-Known Member
I would rather doctors and pharmacists world wide agreed on and used a standard spelling for the drugs they dish out.
 

EEPhil

Number 28
Yes, I checked the sources and discovered 'sulfur' is the "approved" spelling these days... but it doesn't look right.
It doesn’t! I’m sure I’ve seen other sources fighting back with the correct spelling. (Possibly the BBC or other TV news outlet. But, given their propensity for getting things wrong, this is no validation of the spelling.)
I would rather doctors and pharmacists world wide agreed on and used a standard spelling for the drugs they dish out.
That’s never going to happen. They can’t even agree on a pronunciation for various medicines. Hell, they can’t even decide whether they’re chemists or pharmacists half the time. (Boots the Chemist).
 
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