Failing tuner?

#21
Thanks prpr - I have just tried that and both tuners are showing the same results I reported above (ie 50-70% strength and 100% quality) so presumably that means both tuners are working. Can you think of anything else might be causing this problem ?
 

Trev

The Dumb One
#23
Yes it will. You can also record 2progs from two different MUXs and watch a third prog as long as it is on one of the two MUXs being recorded.

This thread is now getting confusing with two different problems being posted.
Can a mod split out Lefteris' posts and answers into a separate thread?
 

prpr

Well-Known Member
#24
Both tuners have Strength around 51% and Quality a solid 100% on all Transponders apart from 7460000Khz & 754000Khz, which report Strength 55-60% (higher) and Quality fluctuating wildly between 20% and 100%.
The problem is obviously in the distribution system in the flats not your equipment. I'm not surprised as it's probably been bodged to solve the COM7/8 mux. move problem.
You are in the unfortunate position of having to pay for a communal system with no effective say in how it is managed. You need someone competent with the correct test gear and with access to all parts of the system. It is a nightmare. I don't know how you're going to get it fixed.
 
OP
OP
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#25
Thanks prpr

I'm still confused as to how I can get good reception on the COM 7 channels if I am recording another channel?

Is the hummy known to have weaker tuners? I just read the Frequency Change article again and this sentence jumped out:

"It has reduced coverage and is only available on newer Freeview devices."

Is this suggesting that some older devices just won't work with this now?

This problem seems to get worse by the day, I'm now starting to get more breakup on the previously good channels BBC1 HD etc.
 

prpr

Well-Known Member
#26
I'm still confused as to how I can get good reception on the COM 7 channels if I am recording another channel?
It's difficult to say. There could be several effects at work here.
"It has reduced coverage and is only available on newer Freeview devices."
Is this suggesting that some older devices just won't work with this now?
Not specifically since the change, no, but it just means you need a DVB-T2 receiver rather than a DVB-T receiver. Which is obviously not a problem for HDR T2s.
This problem seems to get worse by the day, I'm now starting to get more breakup on the previously good channels BBC1 HD etc.
Just because your neighbours' feeds are OK doesn't mean yours is. But you need independent measuring kit, as I said before. Relying on one receiver is a difficult sell to get somebody to come out though. And you need to have ruled out your own locally generated interference (leaky HDMI leads and poorly screened RF fly-leads etc.).
 
#27
Not necessarily, it could possibly be that your TV tuner is a little more sensitive, and that the T2 is 'teetering on the edge' of good reception.
If this were the case, might putting a booster between wall socket and T2 improve the situation?
OP never mentioned whether the TV aerial feed is passed through the T2 or direct from socket.
If it's a pass-through and he adds a booster he might need to switch the TV to a direct connection to avoid overloading the signal for the TV.
 

prpr

Well-Known Member
#28
might putting a booster between wall socket and T2 improve the situation?
No. Boosters make the Carrier/Noise margin worse not better. The problem is not a low signal level, based on figures previously supplied.
I if were to speculate wildly, based on almost no information, I'd say this is probably what's been done upstream already rather than fixing the problem (at a guess an out-of-band aerial). It might have solved the problem for some - just long enough for the cowboy to clear off and get paid.
 
OP
OP
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#30
leaky HDMI leads and poorly screened RF fly-leads etc
I've tried a different RF lead, no difference, no admittedly this and the existing lead are both cheap ones. Is it worth trying a better quality one?

Leaky HDMI leads. Ok, sorry for the drip feed again, I didn't think was at all relevant, but I have experienced occasional crashes of the machine since I started using an Amazon Firestick. I believe these are susceptible to HDMI leak, it often crashes. I can try uplugging this to see if it makes any difference and also try a new HDMI cable to connect the hummy, though the one I have been using is good quality and has worked well for years.

Really hope I can solve this without having to get the aerial looked at.
 

Trev

The Dumb One
#31
If you are going to replace any cables, replace the RF ones not the HDMI first. But before any of that malarky, plug the T2 directly into the aerial socket with nothing else (apart from the TV of course and make sure that the HDMI cable is as far from the aerial cable as is possible.
You still didn't rise to the bait cast in your direction about is the TV aerial fed through the T2?
 
OP
OP
P
#32
If you are going to replace any cables, replace the RF ones not the HDMI first. But before any of that malarky, plug the T2 directly into the aerial socket with nothing else (apart from the TV of course and make sure that the HDMI cable is as far from the aerial cable as is possible.
You still didn't rise to the bait cast in your direction about is the TV aerial fed through the T2?
The T2 is already plugged directly into the aerial socket. The TV connects to the aerial via the T2 (and works ok). Is that what you mean by "fed through the T2"?

I'll try separating the HDMI and RF cables when I'm at home later.
 

prpr

Well-Known Member
#33
the existing lead are both cheap ones. Is it worth trying a better quality one?
Yes. If it's cheap and white and has plastic plugs on the end then throw it away.
Get (or make) one with proper CT100/WF100 cable with screened (i.e. all metal) plugs. Or use F plugs on the cable with F to Co-ax adapters, which are often easier to make than putting on Co-ax plugs yourself.
It may or may not solve the problem, depending on what/where it is, but it won't make it any worse and will remove one thing from the list.
 
OP
OP
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#35
Yes. If it's cheap and white and has plastic plugs on the end then throw it away.
Well, one of them is black, but yes, the sort you normally get in the box when you buy a new TV/PVR

CT100/WF100 cable
I've been looking on Amazon, but I can't find references to this cable in any of the descriptions. Can you send me a link to something suitable on Amazon, pref with Prime next day delivery (I'm a member)?

Is the TV still OK when connected directly to the aerial outlet?
Yes, works fine.
 

Trev

The Dumb One
#36
Put WF 100 into Amazon search. There are loads of hits. Unfortunately most are for 50m drums.
For short patch leads, WF 65 is OK as well. Thinner and more flexible.
Terminate both ends with F Type connectors (make sure that they are for the right size coax) Like THESE for ct/wf 100 and F to Belling Lee (TV) like THESE. You might find them with Prime
 
OP
OP
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#38
Put WF 100 into Amazon search. There are loads of hits. Unfortunately most are for 50m drums.
Ah, I put WF100 RF Cable and it came up with lots of cheap looking cables, but no actual mention of "WF100" in the listing!
That one looks like it has cable rather than aerial connectors.

Would rather get a made up lead than make my own, not that handy with wire strippers etc! I only need 2 meters.
 

Trev

The Dumb One
#39
That one looks like it has cable rather than aerial connectors.
Most people would associate those (F Type) connectors with satellite TV. But they are the easiest and most reliable to fit (providing you use the right size), as fitting the Belling Lee ones is really a bit 'Heath Robinson', but you then need the adaptors that are in my second link to make a really sound 'proper job' that fits your telly.
 
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