Media mistakes

Scrat

Definitely contains acorns
Haha, this needs to cool down. As do those fast charged batteries. And the institute of mechanical engineers for propagating such rumours.

I bet there are conditions in the battery warranty about excessive fast charging. Don't they just pack together loads of those batteries you find in high power torches to make them? The sort you can't easily send by post because they are a fire 🔥 hazard?

And forget the saving the planet argument, we all know how much damage is caused by manufacturing these cars.
 
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Scrat

Definitely contains acorns
I thought mentioning mobile phone gps was hilarious. Why does it work so well? It uses mobile and wifi information for a quick fix. Anyone who has ever used a pure gps receiver will know (a) how slow they are, and (b) how inaccurate they are.

PS Good luck in those tunnels.
 

Scrat

Definitely contains acorns
Oh, and Li supply will not be a problem for the next 30 years, when it will start to run out. It is a limited commodity.
 

MikeSh

Well-Known Member
Anyone who has ever used a pure gps receiver will know (a) how slow they are, and (b) how inaccurate they are.
I don't have that problem at all, even on the cheapish phone I use for biking navigation.
(Though the compass on it is complete garbage for some reason :mad: )

It is a limited commodity.
:rolling:
They've been saying that about oil for last 30 years at least.

It's also likely that other chemistries will take root and this less lithium will be needed than might be predicted at present.
 

gomezz

Well-Known Member
I thought mentioning mobile phone gps was hilarious. Why does it work so well? It uses mobile and wifi information for a quick fix. Anyone who has ever used a pure gps receiver will know (a) how slow they are, and (b) how inaccurate they are.

PS Good luck in those tunnels.
It is the initial fix for a GPS receiver which can take a long time as it needs to lock on to four satellites. If you turn the receiver on in the same place as when you last used it it already knows where it is and it can get a new satellite lock very quickly. The AGPS info from base stations such as mobile phone masts is used to speed up the initial fix but their positioning accuracy is relatively poor compare to that provided by the satellites. AGPS tells it the ball park, the satellites tell it which blade of grass.
 

Scrat

Definitely contains acorns
Blade of grass? You must use a different system to the one I have used this last 20 odd years. 5 metres is good. Once in London, I couldn't even get a fix. A self driving car good to 5m is good for nothing.
 

MikeSh

Well-Known Member
A self driving car good to 5m is good for nothing.
Oh, I'm sorry. I didn't mean the GPS would be used to position the car on the road. It is however essential as the car needs to know, within a few metres, where it is and where it's going/what route it is taking.
Eg. Approaching a junction it may need to cross lanes in advance to be correctly positioned at the intersection.

It should be possible to achieve this without GPS, e.g. by dead-reckoning from distance travelled, landmarks identified and turns made, and this would be good to have should the GPS constellations be smacked down by a 'bad event' (several to choose from).
But I've no idea if anyone is using, or even, working on such system. Might have a poke around that later.
 

hairy_mutley

Active Member
20 years ago and you are almost into selective availability and anti spoofing (Wikipedia says it was switched in May 2000). You would be lucky to get much better than 100 metres unless you were operating differentially or had US military credentials.
 

Scrat

Definitely contains acorns
Well, things have moved on a bit in 20 years - like several new constellations that your machine probably can't receive.
Did you really think I had had the same gps all that time? That wasn't a logical deduction from what I said. I will take everything you said about EVs with a kilo of salt.🤣🤣🤣
 

Scrat

Definitely contains acorns
20 years ago and you are almost into selective availability and anti spoofing (Wikipedia says it was switched in May 2000). You would be lucky to get much better than 100 metres unless you were operating differentially or had US military credentials.
15m with a Garmin eTrex, then a Legend, then a Vista. I invented walking around looking at a bit of electronics well before it caught on. The early items didn't even have maps, but I spent 2 years navigating the US using only waypoints before I got the Vista, which took road maps.

Next, a TomTom, and then another Garmin nuvi, but these were satnavs. Then several cars with satnavs built in.

A series of phones with GPS, two Polar watches and a Garmin venu.
 
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Scrat

Definitely contains acorns
You said:

Seems pretty logical to me.
GPS SATELLITE SYSTEM! Why would I call a receiver a system? You made that illogical deduction, not me.

Let's face it, Tesla have onboard GPS so that their terrified drivers can find the nearest Tesla charging point, don't they?🤣🤣🤣

And now three organizations have put them near the bottom of manufacturer reliability tables, they may need emergency assistance quite often.
 
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MikeSh

Well-Known Member
GPS SATELLITE SYSTEM! Why would I call a receiver a system? You made that illogical deduction, not me.
You used the singular for system. So either you were using only one of the multiple systems available or you were using the same receiver. I thought the latter more likely. But as you say that's not the case can I ask which one of the several systems it is you are using?
 

MikeSh

Well-Known Member
Let's face it, Tesla have onboard GPS so that their terrified drivers can find the nearest Tesla charging point, don't they?🤣🤣🤣

And now three organizations have put them near the bottom of manufacturer reliability tables, they may need emergency assistance quite often.
Non sequitur?
 

Black Hole

May contain traces of nut
On the subject of the Merseyside Police poster cock-up "Being offensive is an offence", somebody is quoted as saying:
Peter Tatchell said:
I am surprised that the police appeared to have not known or understood the law that they are responsible for enforcing.

Surprised? How naïve (and as it's Tatchell, feigned naïvety too)!

Further, some historian I've never heard of is quoted:
Dr Luke Daly-Groves said:
Nobody has a right not to be offended

...a point which appears to escape many, and it's a pity they couldn't find a lawyer/law enforcement officer to quote for that.
 
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